Showing 10 posts tagged volume

As recently as the year 2000, only one-quarter of all the world’s stored information was digital. The rest was preserved on paper, film, and other analog media. But because the amount of digital data expands so quickly — doubling around every three years — that situation was swiftly inverted. Today, less than two percent of all stored information is nondigital.

The Rise of Big Data | Foreign Affairs (via thisistheverge)

(via thisistheverge)

At peak, Amazon sold a whopping 306 items per second in 2012

Amazon has released a large amount of data about online sales in 2012, with lots of factoids and vague figures for digital downloads, purchases, and product shipments. And the biggest piece of data revealed by the company was the number of packages it sold on the peak day of 2012.

On Nov. 26, Amazon sold 26.5 million items worldwide across all product categories. That equates to a whopping 306 items per second, a new record, according to the company.

» via VentureBeat

Too much information can be very dangerous because it can lead to a situation of meaninglessness; that is, people not having any basis for knowing what is relevant, what is irrelevant, what is useful, what is not useful… they live in a culture that is simply committed through all of its media to generate tons and tons of information every hour.

The Great Abbreviators | James Shelley (via slantback)

(via slantback)

Thanks to technology’s mass appeal and accessibility, on a daily basis we collectively produce 2.5 quintillion bytes of data, and the growth rate is so high that 90% of all information ever created was produced in the last two years alone.

What we can do now has never been possible before: the next IT revolution is happening in the “I” - the information - not the “T”.

BBC News - Data wars: Unlocking the information goldmine (via myserendipities)

(via myserendipities)

More Data Was Transmitted Over the Internet in 2010 Than All Previous Years Combined

There was more data transmitted over the Internet in 2010 than the entire history of the Internet through 2009.

Now the transfer of data over the Internet is growing faster than ever, said Vice President of Intel’s Architecture Group Kirk Skaugen during the Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco. He also explained how infrastructure is scaling with the increasing transfer of data.

Skaugen said although there are currently 4 billion connected devices around the world, Intel expects that number to increase to 15 billion by 2015 and 50 billion by 2020.

» via Mashable

Study: Humanity can store 295 exabytes of data

What do you get if you pile up all those USB thumb drives, CDs, chip-enabled credit cards, moldering videocassettes, library books, and Babylonian clay tablets?

About 295 exabytes of storage capacity, that’s what. So conclude Martin Hilbert and Priscilla Lopez, researchers at the University of Southern California, who today published in the journal Science their estimate of just how much information humans can store at present.

» via CNET news

Internet Keeps Growing! Traffic up 62% in 2010

Whether it’s Hulu, or 85 million-plus daily tweets or millions of photos being uploaded to Facebook, Internet traffic keeps growing and growing. That’s not going to change any time soon, mostly because the Internet is now becoming a crucial part of our daily lives. In some parts of the world, it’s hard to escape the ‘net, so to speak. Soon, thanks to the mobile Internet revolution, a massive new majority is going to join the Internet.
Data from research firm Telegeography shows that Internet traffic has grown 62 percent in 2010, after logging a handsome 74 percent growth in 2009. The growth in traffic is coming from non-mature markets likes Eastern Europe and India, where traffic growth between mid-2009 and mid-2010 was in excess of 100 percent.

» via GigaOM High-res

Internet Keeps Growing! Traffic up 62% in 2010

Whether it’s Hulu, or 85 million-plus daily tweets or millions of photos being uploaded to Facebook, Internet traffic keeps growing and growing. That’s not going to change any time soon, mostly because the Internet is now becoming a crucial part of our daily lives. In some parts of the world, it’s hard to escape the ‘net, so to speak. Soon, thanks to the mobile Internet revolution, a massive new majority is going to join the Internet.

Data from research firm Telegeography shows that Internet traffic has grown 62 percent in 2010, after logging a handsome 74 percent growth in 2009. The growth in traffic is coming from non-mature markets likes Eastern Europe and India, where traffic growth between mid-2009 and mid-2010 was in excess of 100 percent.

» via GigaOM

Goodbye petabytes, hello zettabytes

alexanderpf:

By way of stark contrast between the output of present day humanity and its pre-digital predecessor, experts estimate that all human language used since the dawn of time would take up about 5,000 petabytes if stored in digital form, which is less than 1% of the digital content created since someone first switched on a computer.This year, the planet’s digital content will blast through the zettabyte barrier to reach 1.2 ZB, according to the fourth annual survey of the world’s bits and bytes conducted by technology consultancy IDC and sponsored by IT firm EMC. A zettabyte, incidentally, is roughly half a million times the entire collections of all the academic libraries in the United States.

via scudmissile:laughingsquid