Showing 22 posts tagged trends

Newsroom staffing hits 34-year low

The number of journalists working at U.S. newspapers today is at the lowest point since the American Society of News Editors began its annual newsroom census in 1978.

Newspapers now employ 40,600 editors and reporters vs. a peak of 56,900 in the pre-Internet year of 1990, according to the census released today. Thus, newsroom headcount has fallen by 28.6% from its modern-day high.

» via Reflections of a Newsosaur

College Is Cheaper Than You Think

The College Board released its annual report on the cost of college last week, and guess what? It’s going up. Again. Cue the headlines: “College Costs Reach New Highs”; “Public College Costs Surge 8.3 Percent”; “College Tuition Is Out of Control.”

What has been buried in much of the resulting coverage is that while colleges’ published tuition and fees have indeed increased, these so-called “sticker prices” are not all that informative. For the average full-time student, net tuition – which subtracts grants and tax-based aid – is less than half of the published price at private nonprofit four-year schools and less than a third of the published price at the typical public four-year institution.

Moreover, trends in sticker prices and net prices have diverged over the past several years, such that many students are actually paying less now to attend college than they would have five years ago.

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

Three-quarters of students prefer a bound book over the digital equivalent: Student Public Interest Research Groups/BISG January 6 2011. Digital books are less than 3% of textbook sales: National Association of College Stores, October 19 2010. I find the last exception particularly interesting. Students are technically savvy, online all the time, but still prefer print books for study.

Three-quarters of students prefer a bound book over digital, by John Miedema | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics

Enrollments Plunge at Many For-Profit Colleges

Enrollment at many for-profit colleges has fallen sharply in recent months, a reflection of a weak economy and increased scrutiny of the sector.

New-student enrollment declined an average of 14.1 percent this quarter at 10 of the biggest for-profit educators, according to company financial disclosures and analysts’ reports. The slide has come as some of those institutions curbed their aggressive recruiting practices amid growing pressure from federal and state lawmakers.

» via The Chronicle of Higher Education (Subscription may be required for some content)

New report: Search and email still top the list of most popular online activities
Search and email remain the two online activities that are nearly  universal among adult internet users, as 92% of online adults use search  engines to find information on the Web, and a similar number (92%) use  email.
Since we began measuring adults’ online  activities in the last decade, these two behaviors have consistently  ranked as the most popular, even as new platforms, broadband and mobile  devices continue to reshape the way Americans use the internet and web.  Even as early as 2002, more than eight in ten online adults were using  search engines, and more than nine in ten online adults were emailing.
Read the full report: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Search-and-email.aspx

» via pewinternet

New report: Search and email still top the list of most popular online activities

Search and email remain the two online activities that are nearly universal among adult internet users, as 92% of online adults use search engines to find information on the Web, and a similar number (92%) use email.

Since we began measuring adults’ online activities in the last decade, these two behaviors have consistently ranked as the most popular, even as new platforms, broadband and mobile devices continue to reshape the way Americans use the internet and web. Even as early as 2002, more than eight in ten online adults were using search engines, and more than nine in ten online adults were emailing.

Read the full report: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Search-and-email.aspx

» via pewinternet

In fact, various forms of technology nearly swept the top trends on college campuses, with “drinking beer” the only non-tech interruption in a top 5 dominated by Facebook, iPhones, text messaging, and laptops. (“Working” and “going to grad school” were considered less “in” — though to the extent that the term might be interpreted as an observation of what is cool and/or new, that might not come as a surprise.)

News: Mixed on Media - Inside Higher Ed

A Master’s for Science Professionals Sweeps U.S. Schools

A curiosity tucked away in a handful of university catalogs a decade ago, the professional science master’s degree is emerging from the shadows at a number of college campuses.

The degree, which a few universities quietly pioneered in the mid-1990s, combines graduate studies in science or mathematics and business management courses. In 2008, 58 universities were offering the professional science master’s degree, or P.S.M., according to the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington. By the start of this academic year, the number had nearly doubled to 103, and is set to climb further.

» via The New York Times

Tenure is dying

Tenure is declining. There are many reasons for this, most of which are economic. Tenured professors are very expensive compared to, say, adjuncts and graduate student TAs. Once upon a time in departments far far away, even recitation/discussion sessions were led by tenured faculty members. The only experience I ever had with such a situation was in a department (physics) heavily funded by dollars from the Department of Defense. Don’t say the militaristic state never gave you anything, my fellow classmates. I’m not bragging, but I do think I am pretty clever when it comes to Newtonian physics, at least for a sociologist. The story here is clear in the graphics…or is it?

» via The Society Pages High-res

Tenure is dying

Tenure is declining. There are many reasons for this, most of which are economic. Tenured professors are very expensive compared to, say, adjuncts and graduate student TAs. Once upon a time in departments far far away, even recitation/discussion sessions were led by tenured faculty members. The only experience I ever had with such a situation was in a department (physics) heavily funded by dollars from the Department of Defense. Don’t say the militaristic state never gave you anything, my fellow classmates. I’m not bragging, but I do think I am pretty clever when it comes to Newtonian physics, at least for a sociologist. The story here is clear in the graphics…or is it?

» via The Society Pages

To Trend or Not to Trend...

Twitter Trends are automatically generated by an algorithm that attempts to identify topics that are being talked about more right now than they were previously. The Trends list is designed to help people discover the ‘most breaking’ breaking news from across the world, in real-time. The Trends list captures the hottest emerging topics, not just what’s most popular. Put another way, Twitter favors novelty over popularity (as BuzzFeed noted in a great article & infographic earlier this week).

» via The Twitter Blog

Forrester: iPad kicks off 'tablet mania'

In its research, Forrester notes the rapid consumer awareness of the iPad. The company said that in online surveys in May and June, awareness for the iPad has gone way up. In May, 83 percent of the more than 4,000 respondents said they’ve heard of the iPad. In June, that number jumped to 95 percent awareness.

As a point of comparison, in the same survey 25 percent of consumers said they have never heard of the Amazon Kindle. The Kindle has been on the market for three years.

» via CNET news