Showing 2547 posts tagged tech

Students are always more entrepreneurial and understand needs better than bureaucracies can,” said Harry R. Lewis, the director of undergraduate studies for Harvard’s computer science department, “since bureaucracies tend to have messages they want to spin, and priorities they have to set, and students just want stuff that is useful. I know this well, since students were talking to me about moving the Harvard face books online seven years before Zuckerberg just went and did it without asking permission.

Student-Built Apps Teach Colleges a Thing or Two - NYTimes.com

The hackers infiltrated the networks of the banks, siphoning off gigabytes of data, including checking and savings account information, in what security experts described as a sophisticated cyberattack. The motivation and origin of the attacks are not yet clear, according to investigators. The F.B.I. is involved in the investigation, and in the past few weeks a number of security firms have been brought in to conduct forensic studies of the penetrated computer networks.

JPMorgan and Other Banks Struck by Hackers - NYTimes.com

It’s a horrible irony that at the very moment the world has become more complex, we’re encouraging our young people to be highly specialized in one task.

Why Top Tech CEOs Want Employees With Liberal Arts Degrees (via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)

Just the way the smart home has single-purpose devices as opposed to overall intelligent systems, the development of intelligent roads, athletes and any other system made up of multiple components will feature single-purpose sensors for years before we ever get to unified systems– if we ever get to unified systems. This is unfortunate for consumers who will have to wrangle many apps and also because having multiple platforms can slow the pace of innovation, but thankfully sensors are getting cheaper and we can at least fulfill some of the promise of the internet of things while we wait for an eventual standard or service to unify things to arrive.

Interesting thoughts about sensors and the Internet of Things standardization and growth. (from: We will drown in sensors before we ever build a true internet of things — Tech News and Analysis)

(via analyticisms)

Today, backed by funding from the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, Google, Microsoft, and Qualcomm, Saxena and his team unveiled what they call RoboBrain, a kind of online service packed with information and artificial intelligence software that any robot could tap into. Working alongside researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, Brown University, and Cornell University, they hope to create a massive online “brain” that can help all robots navigate and even understand the world around them. “The purpose,” says Saxena, who dreamed it all up, “is to build a very good knowledge graph—or a knowledge base—for robots to use.”

Any researcher anywhere will be able use the service wirelessly, for free, and transplant its knowledge to local robots. These robots, in turn, will feed what they learn back into the service, improving RoboBrain’s know-how. Then the cycle repeats.

The Plan to Build a Massive Online Brain for All the World’s Robots | Enterprise | WIRED

In just the last 30 days, roughly 900,000 people were infected with a form of ransomware called “ScarePackage,” according to Lookout, a San Francisco-based mobile security firm. “This is, by far, the biggest U.S. targeted threat of ransomware we’ve seen,” said Jeremy Linden, a senior security product manager at Lookout. “In the past month, a single piece of malware has infected as many devices in the U.S., as a quarter of all families of malware in 2013.”

Android Phones Hit by ‘Ransomware’ - NYTimes.com

More worrying is the ability of an attacker to engage in a type of denial-of-service attack on controlled intersections by triggering each intersection’s malfunction management unit, which would put the lights into a failure mode—like all directions blinking red—until physically reset. This would, according to the paper, let “an adversary… disable traffic lights faster than technicians can be sent to repair them.”

Researchers find it’s terrifyingly easy to hack traffic lights | Ars Technica

The assumption has always been that these apps can’t interfere with each other easily," said Zhiyun Qian, an associate professor at UC Riverside. "We show that assumption is not correct and one app can in fact significantly impact another and result in harmful consequences for the user.

Researchers find way to hack Gmail with 92 percent success rate - CNET

Building on cutting edge machine-learning and data-mining techniques, a pair of Carnegie Mellon University researchers have built a new tool designed to accurately predict which Web servers will be hacked before any hacking actually takes place. Call it pre-cybercrime. Kyle Soska and Nicolas Christin, the academics behind the new classification algorithm (they call it a “classifier”), say they trained their tool on 444,519 websites archived using the WayBack Machine, which contains over 4.9 million Web pages. The classifier correctly predicted 66 percent of future hacks in a one-year period with a false positive rate of 17 percent.

New cybersecurity tool lets us predict website hacks before they happen