Showing 2401 posts tagged tech

Technology means that no matter what kind of job you have — even if you’re alone in a truck on an empty road — your company can now measure everything you do. In Earle’s case, those measurements go into a little black box in the back of his truck. At the end of the day, the data get sent to Paramus, N.J., where computers crunch through the data from UPS trucks across the country. ‘The data are about as important as the package for us,’ says Jack Levis, who’s in charge of the UPS data. It’s his job to think about small amounts of time and large amounts of money. ‘Just one minute per driver per day over the course of a year adds up to $14.5 million,’ Levis says.

The Data-Driven Optimization of the Worker - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic

In this survey, 92 percent of IT personnel admitted that they did, indeed, sneak peeks — under the guise of doing their job, you understand — at the details buried in workers’ computers. The other 8 percent work in monasteries. At least that’s my assumption. Perhaps you won’t be surprised at the things these IT snoopers (42 percent of whom where female) see. Eighty-two percent observe the obvious — workers wafting onto social media sites of varying hues, rather than being what used to be called productive. Surely even work is social these days. Fifty-seven percent insist that a huge problem is e-mail attachments of dubious provenance being opened. I have no evidence that any of these IT managers work for US Airways. Fifty-two percent say that workers download games onto their office computers. And don’t get them started about the unauthorized USB and other devices that get plugged into the precious office machines. It seems there’s also a lot of pirating going on in office time and on office equipment; 45 percent said they had seen evidence. But perhaps the most enjoyable of all is observing just how many people in your office are applying for other jobs. Thirty-nine percent of IT managers said that, oh, yes, they’d seen job applications flying on work computers.

Big Brother really is watching you (It’s your IT manager) - CNET

“When people can’t apply for jobs or access government services because they don’t have access from home, public libraries must be there for them,” said Linda Lord, a librarian in Maine. “Where else are they going to go? Police station? Town hall? I don’t think so.” Though 62 percent of libraries offer the only free computer and Internet access in their communities, only 9 percent say they have the high-capacity connections needed to support the computers, Wi-Fi and technological training necessary for an increasingly paperless world. Some libraries connect to the Web at speeds that barely allow them to stream video services — less than 3 megabits per second — though many are now operating at up to 10 mbps. The goal is to upgrade all connections to at least 100 mbps.

Libraries Seek High-Speed Broadband - NYTimes.com

You don’t begin a marriage by walking through a metal detector with two lawyers. Nor do I believe that you should end a marriage that way.

Now You Can File For Divorce Online With Wevorce, The H&R Block Of Nasty Breakups

Today not only can you find the love of your life online—now you can also divorce them.

Read More>

(via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)

The American Academy of Pediatrics is unequivocal: If your kid is under 2, no screens. For older kids, two hours a day, max. But the AAP doesn’t differentiate between activities; education apps, base-jumping videos, first-person shooters, ebooks, Sesame Street, and The Shining are all thrown into the same bucket. It’s all just screen time. Trouble is, they’re not all the same. An app that teaches your kid his ABCs isn’t the same as a television cartoon, but the AAP is probably right to be conservative with its advice. “Researchers know almost nothing about the impact of touchscreen technology on young children,” says Heather Kirkorian, an assistant professor of human development and family studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is trying to find some answers. “Our society is running a large-scale experiment with real children in the real world, and we won’t know the impact, if any, for many years to come.”

Are Touchscreens Melting Your Kid’s Brain? | Gadget Lab | WIRED

Our automated systems analyze your content (including e-mails) to provide you personally relevant product features, such as customized search results, tailored advertising, and spam and malware detection. This analysis occurs as the content is sent, received, and when it is stored.

All sent and received e-mails in Gmail will be analyzed, says Google | Ars Technica

"When you are dealing with so many different sources of information and so many different offices that need to be involved in the response to a problem, there has to be a reporting structure that brings it all together," Mr. McRobbie says. The changes mean that the university now has uniform response procedures—a tool kit, Mr. Bruhn calls it—that can be applied to cybersecurity and physical-security incidents alike. "It is that structure that provides us with a huge amount of comfort because we know even if it is a one-off sort of incident, we have a structure that is amoeba-like enough that it can cover just about anything that can happen," he says.

Indiana U. Puts IT and Safety Under One Umbrella - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

This boardroom is about the only thing that hasn’t changed around here,” he told a visitor, sitting at an antique conference table in the heart of Wyndeham’s printing plant here. “Everything else in this plant is different. All the equipment has been changed, and so have the people.” In many ways, printing itself has gone digital. Industrial-strength laser printers enable big printing plants to make quick and cost-effective small-batch runs on demand. Even Wyndeham’s big offset machines — which print from lithographic plates created from digital files — are so highly automated that a crew of just a dozen or so can put them through their paces. “This is almost a peopleless business now,” Mr. Kingston said as he walked through the huge but mostly deserted printing hall. “At one point we had 350 people in this plant. Now we have 114. But the amount of work has more than doubled.

Leaner and More Efficient, British Printers Push Forward in Digital Age - NYTimes.com

The results are a strong indication that merely updating servers to a version of OpenSSL that’s not vulnerable to Heartbleed isn’t enough. Because Heartbleed exploits don’t by default show up in server logs, there’s no way for sites that were vulnerable to rule out the possibility the private certificate key was plucked out of memory by hackers. Anyone possessing the private key can use it to host an impostor site that is virtually impossible for most end users to detect. Anyone visiting the bogus site would see the same https prefix and padlock icon accompanying the site’s authentic server. The demonstration that it’s possible to extract private SSL certificates means that out of an abundance of caution, administrators of sites that used vulnerable versions of OpenSSL should revoke and replace old certificates with new ones as soon as possible. Given the huge number of sites affected, the revelation could create problems.

Private crypto keys are accessible to Heartbleed hackers, new data shows | Ars Technica

In short: The NSA is said to have decided that the exploit was better something for it to use as an offensive tool than to affect a defensive posture for the rest [of] tech; its decision meant that in its view, its own intelligence efforts were essentially more important than the security of your information.

NSA Exploited Heartbleed For Years,” TechCrunch (via shortformblog)