Survey: iPad adoption sluggish but e-textbooks booming

Electronic textbooks and computing tablets have a lot of buzz, but the old bound volumes and desktop models still dominate on four-year college campuses, according to a new survey.

» via Inside Higher Ed High-res

Survey: iPad adoption sluggish but e-textbooks booming

Electronic textbooks and computing tablets have a lot of buzz, but the old bound volumes and desktop models still dominate on four-year college campuses, according to a new survey.

» via Inside Higher Ed

Tablet Ownership Triples Among College Students

The number of college students who say they own tablets has more than tripled since a survey taken last year, according to new poll results released today. The Pearson Foundation sponsored the second-annual survey, which asked 1,206 college students and 204 college-bound high-school seniors about their tablet ownership. The results suggest students increasingly prefer to use the devices for reading.

One-fourth of the college students surveyed said they owned a tablet, compared with just 7 percent last year. Sixty-three percent of college students believe tablets will replace textbooks in the next five years—a 15 percent increase over last year’s survey. More than a third said they intended to buy a tablet sometime in the next six months.

This year’s poll also found that the respondents preferred digital books over printed ones. It’s a reversal of last year’s results and goes against findings of other recent studies, which concluded that students tend to choose printed textbooks. The new survey found that nearly six in 10 students preferred digital books when reading for class, compared with one-third who said they preferred printed textbooks.

» via The Chronicle of Higher Education (Subscription may be required for some content)

E-Books on Tablets Fight Digital Distractions

Can you concentrate on Flaubert when Facebook is only a swipe away, or give your true devotion to Mr. Darcy while Twitter beckons?

People who read e-books on tablets like the iPad are realizing that while a book in print or on a black-and-white Kindle is straightforward and immersive, a tablet offers a menu of distractions that can fragment the reading experience, or stop it in its tracks.

E-mail lurks tantalizingly within reach. Looking up a tricky word or unknown fact in the book is easily accomplished through a quick Google search. And if a book starts to drag, giving up on it to stream a movie over Netflix or scroll through your Twitter feed is only a few taps away.

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

But with the boom in tablet technology, recipes have begun to travel with their users from home to the office to the market and, most important, into the kitchen. With features like embedded links, built-in timers, infographics and voice prompts, the richness of some new apps — like Baking With Dorie, from the baking expert Dorie Greenspan; Jamie Oliver’s 20-Minute Meals; and Professional Chef, the vast app released last month by the Culinary Institute of America — hint that books as kitchen tools are on the way out. “I never thought I would say this, but I don’t go anywhere without my iPad,” said Kristin Young, a collector of cookbooks in Santa Barbara, Calif., who said that even her favorite volumes are gathering dust. “If it’s not on my tablet, it’s just not useful anymore.”

Are Apps Making Cookbooks Obsolete? - NYTimes.com

One in Ten Adults Own Tablet Computers

Nearly 18 months after the introduction of the iPad, one in 10 U.S. adults now owns a tablet computer and uses it an average of 90 minutes a day.

A new study conducted by Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism in collaboration with The Economist Group found that more people are flocking to tablet computers, especially for reading news each day.

» via Live Science

Ladies love e-readers; guys prefer tablets

Is it too early to assign gender stereotypes to gadgets? New Nielsen data suggests that e-readers are more popular with women while guys prefer their tablets. Smartphones are now equally popular between the sexes.

According to Nielsen’s second-quarter survey, 61 percent of e-reader owners are women, up from 46 percent in the third quarter of last year. Meanwhile, men make up 57 percent of tablet owners, which is down from 61 percent in the third quarter. Smartphones are used equally by women and men.

» via GigaOM

New report: E-reader ownership doubles in six months, while tablet ownership grows more slowly
Twelve percent of U.S. adults own an e-book reader as of May 2011, according to our latest report, up from 6% in November 2010. Hispanic adults, adults younger than age 65, college graduates and those living in households with incomes of at least $75,000 are most likely to own e-book readers. Parents are also more likely than non-parents to own these devices.
Meanwhile, tablet computers have not seen the same level of growth among U.S. adults in recent months. As of May 2011, 8% of adults report owning a tablet computer such as an iPad, Samsung Galaxy or Motorola Xoom. This represents just a 3 percentage-point increase in ownership since November 2010. Overall, the highest rates of tablet ownership are among Hispanic adults and those with household incomes of at least $75,000 annually. Read more…

» via pewinternet

New report: E-reader ownership doubles in six months, while tablet ownership grows more slowly

Twelve percent of U.S. adults own an e-book reader as of May 2011, according to our latest report, up from 6% in November 2010. Hispanic adults, adults younger than age 65, college graduates and those living in households with incomes of at least $75,000 are most likely to own e-book readers. Parents are also more likely than non-parents to own these devices.

Meanwhile, tablet computers have not seen the same level of growth among U.S. adults in recent months. As of May 2011, 8% of adults report owning a tablet computer such as an iPad, Samsung Galaxy or Motorola Xoom. This represents just a 3 percentage-point increase in ownership since November 2010. Overall, the highest rates of tablet ownership are among Hispanic adults and those with household incomes of at least $75,000 annually. Read more

» via pewinternet

comScore: the iPad Owns 97 Percent of US Tablet Traffic

As part of its new “device essentials” data product release comScore put out some interesting comparative findings about web traffic patterns from a broad array of mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. But among tablets we’re really only talking about the iPad.

» via SearchEngineLand High-res

comScore: the iPad Owns 97 Percent of US Tablet Traffic

As part of its new “device essentials” data product release comScore put out some interesting comparative findings about web traffic patterns from a broad array of mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets. But among tablets we’re really only talking about the iPad.

» via SearchEngineLand

90% of consumers have tablet fever according to new survey

Samsung on Tuesday released the findings of a recent survey intended to determine just how desirable consumer tablets are in the U.S. According to the survey, which was commissioned by Samsung Mobile and conducted by Kelton Research, 90% of U.S. consumers either already own a tablet or would consider purchasing a tablet.

» via BGR

Explore the British Library’s 19th Century collection on the iPad

One of the joys of tablet devices is being able to sit back and relax while you explore a wide range of often beautifully presented content. A case in point is the new app from The British Library. In partnership with developer BiblioLabs, a selection of over 1000 19th Century books.
Although you’ll find plenty of novels from classic authors of the time, like Thomas Hardy and George Eliot, it’s the obscure books that are unlikely to emerge on platforms like the Kindle that are particularly interesting.

» via TheNextWeb

Explore the British Library’s 19th Century collection on the iPad

One of the joys of tablet devices is being able to sit back and relax while you explore a wide range of often beautifully presented content. A case in point is the new app from The British Library. In partnership with developer BiblioLabs, a selection of over 1000 19th Century books.

Although you’ll find plenty of novels from classic authors of the time, like Thomas Hardy and George Eliot, it’s the obscure books that are unlikely to emerge on platforms like the Kindle that are particularly interesting.

» via TheNextWeb