Showing 148 posts tagged retail

These sanctions have driven down Hachette authors’ sales at Amazon.com by at least 50 percent and in some cases as much as 90 percent,” reads the letter from Authors United, which currently has around 1,070 names attached. “Because of Amazon’s immense market share and its proprietary Kindle platform, other retailers have not made up the difference. Several thousand Hachette authors have watched their readership decline, or, in the case of new authors, have seen their books sink out of sight without finding an adequate readership. These men and women are deeply concerned about what this means for their future careers.

Nearly 1,100 Authors Say Amazon Feud With Publisher Has Hurt Sales By Up To 90% – Consumerist

“On the list of companies that mistreat their suppliers, Amazon is one that stands out,” said Sucharita Mulpuru, an analyst at Forrester.

Amazon Picks Favorites With Brands in ‘Pay to Play’ Move - Bloomberg

Starting on Thursday, book buyers in Manhattan, West Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area will be able to get same-day deliveries from local Barnes & Noble stores through Google Shopping Express, Google’s fledgling online shopping and delivery service. Google Shopping, which began operations about a year ago, allows online shoppers to order products from stores like Costco, Walgreens, Staples and Target, and have them delivered to their doors within hours. The partnership could help Barnes & Noble make inroads into online sales when its brick-and-mortar business remains stagnant. The company has closed 63 stores in the last five years, including some in bustling areas of Manhattan and Washington, leaving it with a base of about 660 retail stores and 700 college campus stores. Its Nook business fell 22 percent in the fourth quarter compared with the period a year earlier, according its most recent earnings report.

Google and Barnes & Noble Unite to Take On Amazon - NYTimes.com

Mr. Armato says he frequently hears from scholars that they turn to Amazon for the books they need, especially when interlibrary loan proves too slow or cumbersome. The downside is that “this has gone hand in hand with the decline of library sales for the university-press monograph,” he says. Scholars might buy fewer books through Amazon if their libraries were buying more of those books in the first place. University presses also wonder to what extent libraries are buying books directly from Amazon as well as through the distributors that traditionally deliver scholarly books to the library market. Amazon doesn’t really share customer data, so “we just don’t know where those books are going,” Mr. Armato says. “We have no idea who the final purchasers are.” (Ms. Darksmith at California’s press says that, as a retailer with a focus on customer service, Amazon isn’t really “set up to feed back that kind of information” to the suppliers whose goods it sells.) For its part, Amazon considers university presses “an important and growing business for us, and we appreciate the role they play in disseminating research and education content,” a company spokeswoman says via email. “We don’t comment on our business terms, but we always work to develop strong professional relationships with publishers, including university presses, so together we can deliver low prices and a great experience for our customers.”

Around Retail Giant Amazon, University Presses Tiptoe and Whisper - Publishing - The Chronicle of Higher Education

By 2020, Sandler reckons Amazon could have 100 million Prime subscribers, one of the biggest membership clubs of any industry, and worth a cumulative $70 billion. In this light, Amazon’s market cap of about $165 billion (which looks ridiculous when compared to last year’s profit of just $274 million) starts to look justifiable.

Amazon is building the retail world’s most unbreachable “moat”—and it’s called Prime - Quartz

Driving the prices lower isn’t likely to expand the market of readers, since book prices don’t seem to be the deciding factor on whether someone reads a book (time is). But those lower prices directly shrink the incomes of authors, who lack any other means of translating their sales into additional revenue.

Amazon Isn’t Killing Writing, The Market Is | TechCrunch

Total album sales, combining physical and digital numbers, were down 15 percent to 121 million, and while Nielsen didn’t confirm how the album numbers split, the announcement of a 13 percent drop in digital singles sales was indicative that MP3s weren’t picking up the sales slack. The digital-single drop of nearly 90 million sales, down to 593.6 million, also didn’t see an equivalent boost in streaming numbers on services such as Spotify; those rose 42 percent to 70.3 million streams, but that was only a jump of 20 million. The numbers didn’t clarify whether streaming services saw any major jumps in subscription purchases this year, as well.

Nielsen: 2014 digital music sales plummet compared to 2013’s first half | Ars Technica

For 2013, publisher revenue from Online Retail now eclipses publisher revenue from all brick-and-mortar channels combined. Online Retail now represents 35.4% of all Trade publisher revenue.

BookStats Volume 4 Now Available: AAP Press Release | BISG

New contracts are also said to include MFN clauses, whereby effectively books cannot be sold for a lower price than Amazon’s anywhere, including on a publisher’s own website. Amazon is also understood to want matching terms where a publisher enters into a new business arrangement, for example with a subscription service. Publishers told The Bookseller that MFN clauses had disappeared from contracts, but were now making a reappearance. Another clause of particular note requires publishers to guarantee they have books in stock, allowing Amazon to do print-on-demand editions to customers – with extra terms benefits – should books be out of supply. The clause has echoes of a demand made in 2008 that small publishers use its POD service, with Amazon arguing at that time that it could “provide a better, more timely customer experience if the p.o.d. titles are printed inside our own fulfilment centres”. Publishers are worried that the clause would allow Amazon to effectively take over their stock-control.

Amazon pressing for new terms in UK | The Bookseller

It feels like the company is essentially deciding that it’s no longer really part of the digital revolution,” said James L. McQuivey, an analyst at Forrester Research. Speaking of the physical retail stores, he said, “You’re only managing how quickly it will continue to decline.

Barnes & Noble to Spin Off Nook Unit as Sales Continue to Fall - NYTimes.com