Although Myspace boasts the biggest library in digital music — more than 50 million songs, it says — a group representing thousands of small labels says the service is using its members’ music without permission. The group, Merlin, negotiates digital deals on behalf of labels around the world. Charles Caldas, chief executive of Merlin, said in an interview on Friday that its deal with Myspace expired over a year ago, yet songs from more than 100 of its labels are still available on Myspace, including Beggars Group, Domino and Merge, three of the biggest independents. “While it’s nice that Mr. Timberlake is launching his service on this platform, and acting as an advocate for the platform,” Mr. Caldas said, “on the other hand his peers as artists are being exploited without permission and not getting remuneration for it.”

Myspace Is Accused of Using Music Without Permission - NYTimes.com

This might sound paradoxical, but allowing users to control nearly every aspect of their Myspace profile was a decision that ultimately sucked all of the enjoyment out of the experience.

What Myspace got wrong, and why nobody misses it | Technology News Blog - Yahoo! News

When you look back at how little MySpace changed between 2005 and 2007, it’s staggering,” Mr. Piskorski said. “For Facebook to be taken over, there would need to be a drastic slowdown in the rate of innovation. It would take a lot of work to undermine what Facebook has achieved so far.

Social Networks Capitalize on Facebook Privacy Fears
bunch:

Guess Who’s Coming To MySpace?
From a report on Inside Facebook:
We don’t have too many specific details on what the [Facebook] Connect integration [with MySpace] will look like, although our sources described it as being “everywhere,” with some News Corp. managers apparently “shocked” by how deep it is.
The move comes on the heels of Yahoo!’s announcement that they too would integrate Facebook Connect throughout their network.
Is everyone just ceding social to Zuckerberg & Co? Has the whole world gone mad?

bunch:

Guess Who’s Coming To MySpace?

From a report on Inside Facebook:

We don’t have too many specific details on what the [Facebook] Connect integration [with MySpace] will look like, although our sources described it as being “everywhere,” with some News Corp. managers apparently “shocked” by how deep it is.

The move comes on the heels of Yahoo!’s announcement that they too would integrate Facebook Connect throughout their network.

Is everyone just ceding social to Zuckerberg & Co? Has the whole world gone mad?

The thing you see in this space more than anything else is that if you don’t keep innovating and moving forward, you get in trouble. You can’t stop. And MySpace stopped.

Jonathan Miller of News Corp, the company that owns MySpace.

(via Dan Claremont)

(via obsoletethebook)

Who Is on the Other End of Facebook?

It’s easy to see the reasons for the excitement [around social media]. With the steady decline of one of our most reliable platforms—print media—and the enormous growth and popularity of the new social-networking tools, we public-relations professionals need to adapt and incorporate the latest technology into our marketing plans. We need to be savvy about the information-gathering habits of the next generation of college students, not to mention communicate effectively with our current students and young alumni. We ignore social networking and communications technology at our peril.

I’m like most of my peers: fascinated and eager to learn, yet wary at times, and sometimes old-fashioned in my thinking. A revolution is taking place, and I would be a fool not to take part in it. But “new” does not always equal “better,” and, to borrow an expression from the fading Pulp Age, it’s critical that we not lose sight of the forest for the trees. Revolutions, after all, can be alternately energizing, unstoppable, and unsettling, and sometimes the wrong people get beheaded.

Seen at The Chronicle of Higher Education (Subscription may be required for some content)

How Facebook Beat MySpace: From College Dorm to Platform


  Two years ago Danah Boyd’s article “Viewing 
  American Class Divisions Through Facebook and MySpace” mesmerized marketers and tech journalists. Facebook was described as “hegemonic” while MySpace was the haven of “subaltern” teens. Whether Boyd intended it or not, Facebook became characterized as the privileged space of college kids and MySpace was plagued with the perception of lowbrow tackiness. At the time it made sense that a site for the privileged had less traffic. After all, isn’t privilege generally exclusive? According to a recent Hitwise blog post Facebook is not only beating MySpace’s traffic, it’s the second ranked site overall in the US behind Google.


Seen at ReadWriteWeb High-res

How Facebook Beat MySpace: From College Dorm to Platform

Two years ago Danah Boyd’s article “Viewing American Class Divisions Through Facebook and MySpace” mesmerized marketers and tech journalists. Facebook was described as “hegemonic” while MySpace was the haven of “subaltern” teens. Whether Boyd intended it or not, Facebook became characterized as the privileged space of college kids and MySpace was plagued with the perception of lowbrow tackiness. At the time it made sense that a site for the privileged had less traffic. After all, isn’t privilege generally exclusive? According to a recent Hitwise blog post Facebook is not only beating MySpace’s traffic, it’s the second ranked site overall in the US behind Google.

Seen at ReadWriteWeb