Showing 44 posts tagged memory

If you thought your life was over when you hit 30 or 40, then bad news - it may have happened much earlier. Most people have enjoyed the best memories of their life by the age of 25, according to new research. A survey of retired people found the life changing highlights etched on their brains happened before they reached age of 25.

Research finds most people have enjoyed the best memories by 25 | Mail Online

Researchers from UC Irvine have found that people with extraordinarily accurate memory are as vulnerable to the inception of fake memories as others, indicating that perhaps nobody is protected from memory distortion. The study, published last month in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, focused on people with highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM), who are able to recall highly specific facts about their lives, like what they ate for lunch, going all the way back to their childhood.

Study suggests we’re all susceptible to false memories | The Verge

New law lets teens delete digital skeletons

Remember that dance-party photo you regretted posting online? How about the time you over-shared your feelings about your ex or made that comment about Barack Obama?

All forever etched in the annals of the Internet.

Well, maybe not - at least if you’re under 18.

Legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday will require Web companies, starting in 2015, to remove online activity - whether it be scandalous or simply embarrassing - should a minor request it.

» via SFGate

Remember the get-to-know-me chat of a first date or that final (good or bad) conversation with someone you knew for years? Chances are, as time has passed, your memory of those moments has changed. Did you nervously twitch and inarticulately explain your love when you asked your spouse to marry you? Or, as you recall it, did you gracefully ask for her hand, as charming as Cary Grant? Thanks to our near-endless access to digital recording devices, the less-than-Hollywood version of you will be immortalized on the home computer, or stored for generations in some digital computing cloud.

What’s Lost When Everything Is Recorded - NYTimes.com

The scientists reported in the journal Science that they caused mice to remember receiving an electrical shock in one location, when in reality they were zapped in a completely different place. The researchers weren’t able to create entirely new thoughts, but they applied good or bad feelings to memories that already existed. “It wasn’t so much writing a memory from scratch, it was basically connecting two different types of memories. We took a neutral memory, and we artificially updated that to make it a negative memory,” said Steve Ramirez, one of the M.I.T. neuroscientists on the project. It may sound insignificant and perhaps not a nice way to treat mice, but it is not a dramatic leap to imagine that one day this research could lead to computer-manipulation of the mind for things like the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, Mr. Ramirez said.

Computer-Brain Interfaces Making Big Leaps - NYTimes.com
Odor Camera Turns Your Favorite Smells Into Memories

Smell, more than any of our other senses, has a way of digging up memories from our past. We all have them—those vague, familiar scents that you can’t quite put your finger on but remind you of your grandmother’s house or a warm summer night or of someone you love. These whimsical moments of nostalgia waft across our consciousness as we walk past a bakery or sit next to a stranger on the train, and they fade away just as quickly as they appeared. But what if they didn’t have to disappear? What if you could capture the smells and keep them in little glass bottles until the next time you wanted to revisit a memory?

» via Wired High-res

Odor Camera Turns Your Favorite Smells Into Memories

Smell, more than any of our other senses, has a way of digging up memories from our past. We all have them—those vague, familiar scents that you can’t quite put your finger on but remind you of your grandmother’s house or a warm summer night or of someone you love. These whimsical moments of nostalgia waft across our consciousness as we walk past a bakery or sit next to a stranger on the train, and they fade away just as quickly as they appeared. But what if they didn’t have to disappear? What if you could capture the smells and keep them in little glass bottles until the next time you wanted to revisit a memory?

» via Wired

But in the relentless drive to collect all of the world’s moments, it is ignoring that there is something meaningful about a photo or video that is destined to be forgotten—a record that does not simply capture a moment but is itself only a moment.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/elements/2013/06/instagram-videos-and-the-impulse-to-capture-every-moment.html (via djoliot)

(via everythingisdisrupted)

There are situations in life that it’s better that they don’t exist. Especially if there is stuff you did when you were a teenager. Teenagers are now in an adult world online.

Google’s Schmidt: Teens’ mistakes will never go away | Technically Incorrect - CNET News

Googling has, arguably, made Millennials less able than any previous group of twentysomethings to retain information. Recent research suggests that they use Google as a sort of auxiliary memory. In 2011 a team of psychologists led by Betsy Sparrow of Columbia gave 60 undergrads a bunch of trivia (on the order of “an ostrich’s eye is bigger than its brain”) and asked them to type all forty factoids into a computer. Half were told that the file containing these facts would be accessible later; half were told the file would be erased. On a subsequent test of memory, the ones who thought everything would be erased remembered much more. When they believed their document would be saved, Sparrow found, they didn’t bother remembering it; they figured they could always find it (or, as it’s called outside the lab, Google it) when they needed to.

Does Constant Googling Really Make You Stupid? [Excerpt]: Scientific American