Showing 219 posts tagged media

It struck me that part of the reason we always stay jacked in is that we want everyone — at the other end of the phone, on Facebook and Twitter, on the web, on email — to know that we are part of the now. If we look away, we worry we will disappear.

David Carr, writing eloquently as usual about the death of print. (via parislemon)

The network argues that Dish “engages in virtually identical conduct” to Aereo by allowing customers to stream the broadcasts over the Internet. FOX claims that Dish is thus engaging in an illegal public performance and can’t hide behind the defense that it is only providing the equipment for streaming or that it is the subscribers who are doing the transmitting to themselves from their own copies.

Broadcasters Using Aereo Ruling To Try To Shut Down Dish’s Streaming Service – Consumerist

But after a sharp upturn in 2012–13 – when a large number of paywalls were introduced – our data show very little change in the absolute number of people paying for digital news over the past year. In most countries the number paying for any news is hovering around 10% of online users and in some cases less than that.

Paying for Digital News - Digital News Report 2014

PwC’s analysts say the money earned from on-demand video will rise by $10 billion in five years. Online and TV-based streaming services combined to pull in a revenue of $7.34 billion in 2013, a figure that PwC says will rise to $11.47 billion in 2016, before reaching $17.03 billion in 2018. That rise will be driven primarily by subscription video services such as Netflix and Hulu, PwC says, rather than by through-TV subscriptions.

Video streaming services could make more money than the US box office by 2017 | The Verge

The shift to digital that has demolished some print publications is very much generational. And, from a generational perspective, this shift is only just beginning. Media consumers in their 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s grew up reading newspapers and magazines. Old habits die hard. Many of these consumers will never be as comfortable with digital as they are with paper, and they will keep reading newspapers and magazines until the day they die. But media consumers in the 0s, 10s, 20s, and 30s have no such print habits or allegiances. To them, the idea of printing information on a dead tree and then trucking it to houses and newsstands seems ludicrous, old-fashioned, inconvenient, and wasteful. To these folks, paper-based publications are a pain to carry and search, easy to misplace, and hard to share, and the information in them is outdated the moment it appears. For those who weren’t raised on paper, digital is superior in almost every way.

Media Usage By Age - Business Insider

In comparison to the 1.1 minutes spent daily at newspaper sites, the average time spent on social media is 33 minutes per day and the average time spent at search sites is 3.6 minutes per day, said Andrew Lipsman, a vice president of comScore.

Reflections of a Newsosaur: Average visit at newspaper site: 1.1 minutes

The Court believes that “legalizing” file-sharing encourages the distribution of counterfeit and pirated works. In addition, it explains that the system poses “an unfair disadvantage to the copyright holders.” The Court further notes that the Dutch system also punishes those who buy their digital movies and music from authorized sources, as they also pay the piracy levy on the devices and media they record them to. “All users are indirectly penalized since they necessarily contribute towards the compensation payable for the harm caused by private reproductions made from an unlawful source. Users consequently find themselves required to bear an additional, non-negligible cost in order to be able to make private copies,” the Court notes.

The Netherlands Must Outlaw Downloading, EU Court Rules (Update) | TorrentFreak

The upshot is that entertainment industries have, in the last half-century, gone from simple merchants—buy a ticket in this physical store; buy an album in this physical store—to digital cephalopods, sticking their tentacles into a multitude of diverse businesses and adapting surprisingly quickly to consumer habits as we fall in and out of love with different ways of watching video and listening to music.

The Future of Media Will Be Streamed - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic

The new policy, shown to the editorial staff in a PowerPoint presentation in late February, provides that as much as 75 percent of reporters’ job performance will be based on measurable web-based metrics, including how often they post to Oregonlive.com. Beat reporters will be expected to post at least three times a day, and all reporters are expected to increase their average number of posts by 40 percent over the next year. In addition, reporters have been told to stir up online conversations among readers. “On any post of substance, reporter will post the first comment,” the policy says. “Beat reporters [are to] solicit ideas and feedback through posts, polls and comments on a daily basis.” The Oregonian will hand out yearly bonuses—if the finances of the company allows it—to reporters who exceed these goals. The policy says “final performance ratings will determine merit pay.”

With Quotas and Incentive Pay, The Oregonian is Again Reshaping Its Experience for Readers

There’s not even agreement on facts nowadays. That’s one of the problems of the division in the media and partisan cable networks. On one you may hear a fact that’s completely different from the other. Unless you have agreement on facts it’s very hard to agree on remedies for a problem.

How More Information Often Makes Us Less Informed | In Their Own Words | Big Think