Showing 61 posts tagged life

When I was an underpaid, over-worked, under-respected public school teacher, I never bragged about being busy. I just was," says Kim, who lives in San Francisco. "And I never bragged about what I was doing… I quietly wished I had my life back." She now works as an academic writing writing coach for students, and her schedule is a little less crazy. She said, "When I ‘busy brag’ now, it’s usually a passive-aggressive way of saying, ‘Hey, can you give me some kudos for all this effort I’m putting in?

We complain about being ‘too busy’ — but secretly we like it - TODAY.com

Economists have noted how work hours for white collar, college-educated workers began to become extreme in about the 1980s, and at the same time, social surveys were picking up a heightened sense of economic insecurity in this same group. Some people say we’re working more because we want more stuff (like that stupid Cadillac commercial that made me so angry I wrote a piece about it). While it’s true that household debt and spending on “luxury” items have gone up at the same time, it’s also true that wages have been stagnating and the costs of basic things like health care, housing, and education have gone through the roof—the cost of college has blown up nearly 900 percent in recent decades. When was the last time anyone outside hedge fund managers and the 1 percent got a 900 percent raise? Against that backdrop comes technology and the ability to be connected 24/7 - which leads to a feeling of constantly being “on call,” that you can never quite get away from work, that the boundaries that used to keep work more contained have bled and spilled over into the hours of the day that used to be for family, for self, for leisure, for sleep.

America’s Workers: Stressed Out, Overwhelmed, Totally Exhausted - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic

Today, if you peeked through the curtains of any living-room on an average night you’d find more than half of us focused not on our family, nor even the television, but on the other screen on our laps.

How technology is changing our likes and loves - Telegraph

You know, the oddest thing about what’s happening right now is that we’ve stopped living our lives and we’re just recording them.

George Clooney, recalling what he told President Obama during a fundraiser in which no one wanted to shake their hands, they just wanted to take their picture. (via parislemon)

The practice of taking an intentional break from technology and civilization is probably as old as technology and civilization. But it seems increasingly urgent now, in an era when the Internet—and thus most of the planet—is as close as an iPhone. We go to seek waldeinsamkeit, as the poet Ralph Waldo Emerson described it—the feeling of being alone in the woods.

Can’t Get Away From It All? The Problem Isn’t Technology — It’s You | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Some tech holdouts boast of their monastic resolve. Others try to hide it. But for all of us, the choice becomes part of our public identity. One day you’re Jane Smith, lawyer and marathon runner. Then, like Kevin Costner among the Sioux, you’re He Who Lives Without Facebook.

Confessions of a Cellphone Holdout - WSJ.com

Face it: the future cannot be predicted. Models are fine but the real world is rife with the humors of non-linearity, shivering across vast ecosystems that make nice spreadsheet charts turn into run-away hockey-sticks with the flap of a butterfly’s wings. Like stock market crashes, riots, and earthquakes, discontinuities warp linear projections with sudden disruptions that often defy prediction. As they say, change is the only constant.

Future Thinking Isn’t About The Future, It’s About The Present | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation

At Tech-Free Camps, People Pay Hundreds To Unplug

The overwhelming and endless stream of electronic alerts and messages on our computers, phones and tablets is driving demand for a new kind of summer camp for adults. “Technology-free” camps that force their campers to surrender their gadgets, wallets and that nagging “fear of missing out” — FOMO — are booking up fast.

In June, Digital Detox held its first session of Camp Grounded, a three-day break from electronic devices in the Redwoods of Northern California. At a price tag of $350, the event sold out.

"You read articles about being present and being in the moment, and you kind of nod your head and you agree. But I don’t think you know what that means until you put everything away and you’re OK with where you are," says Anastasia Savvina, who attended the June camp.

» via NPR

“Nobody can think anymore because they’re constantly interrupted,” said Leslie Perlow, a Harvard Business School professor and author of “Sleeping With Your Smartphone.” “Technology has enabled this expectation that we always be on.” Workers fear the repercussions that could result if they are unavailable, she said. The intermingling of work and personal life adds to the onslaught, as people communicate about personal topics during the workday, and about work topics when they are at home.

Messages Galore, but No Time to Think - NYTimes.com