Showing 1227 posts tagged law

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” the company wrote in the new privacy policy. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.” The move is a major step meant to reassure people that their privacy is safe on Apple devices.

Apple: New iPhones can’t be unlocked — even with a warrant | TheHill

"Wholesale removal of thousands of cases from PACER, particularly from four of our federal courts of appeals, will severely limit access to information not only for legal practitioners, but also for legal scholars, historians, journalists, and private litigants for whom PACER has become the go-to source for most court filings," Leahy wrote Friday to US District Judge John D. Bates, the director of the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO).

Senator demands US courts recover 10 years of online public records | Ars Technica

In today’s increasingly connected world, it is critical that every phone company honor its duty to inform customers of their privacy choices and then to respect those choices,” Travis LeBlanc, acting head of the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau, said in a statement. “It is plainly unacceptable for any phone company to use its customers’ personal information for thousands of marketing campaigns without even giving them the choice to opt out.

Verizon to pay $7M over privacy violations | TheHill

The cameras scan at an extremely high rate, usually around 60 plates per second. Law enforcement policies vary widely concerning how long that information can be retained. Different agencies keep that data anywhere from a few weeks to indefinitely. Some cities have even mounted such cameras at their city borders, monitoring who comes in and out. Various jurisdictions disagree about whether individuals can access their own LPR records, much less a broader dataset.

Los Angeles cops do not need to hand over license plate reader data, judge finds | Ars Technica

On Thursday, 25-year-old Philip Danks was sentenced to 33 months in jail by a Wolverhampton judge for pirating a copy of Fast and Furious 6. Danks bragged that he was the first person in the world to seed the illicit recording, which he recorded from the back of a local cinema in May 2013. His upload was downloaded around 700,000 times.

British man sentenced to nearly three years in prison for movie piracy | Ars Technica

The story starts with a fugitive, Neil Stammer, who had been on the run since he was arrested for child sex abuse and kidnapping in 1999. According to police reports, Stammer speaks nearly a dozen languages, so when he fled the country using false papers, it left law enforcement with few clues as to where he might be. The case languished for 14 years until this January, when a new facial recognition system found a face that matched Stammer’s. The Diplomatic Security Service had his face on file under the name Kevin Hodges, thanks to a recent visa application to the US Embassy in Nepal. The DSS contacted the FBI, and a few months later Stammer was in custody.

The FBI just used facial recognition to catch a fugitive of 14 years | The Verge

“I’ve had patients ask me, ‘Where’s your baby board?’ ” said Dr. Mark V. Sauer, the director of the office, which is affiliated with Columbia University Medical Center. “We just tell them the truth, which is that we no longer post them because of concerns over privacy.” For generations, obstetricians and midwives across America have proudly posted photographs of the babies they have delivered on their office walls. But this pre-digital form of social media is gradually going the way of cigars in the waiting room, because of the federal patient privacy law known as Hipaa. Under the law, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, baby photos are a type of protected health information, no less than a medical chart, birth date or Social Security number, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. Even if a parent sends in the photo, it is considered private unless the parent also sends written authorization for its posting, which almost no one does.

Baby Pictures at Doctor’s? Cute, Sure, but Illegal - NYTimes.com

O'Bannon judge rules NCAA violates antitrust law

A federal judge ruled Friday that the NCAA’s rules prohibiting athletes from being paid for use of their names, images and likeness violate antitrust law because they “unreasonably restrain trade.” The ruling in the five-year case of the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit allows for trust funds to be established for athletes to share in licensing revenue.

In a 99-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken issued an injunction that will prevent the NCAA “from enforcing any rules or bylaws that would prohibit its member schools and conferences from offering their FBS football or Division I basketball recruits a limited share of the revenues generated from the use of their names, images and likenesses in addition to a full grant-in-aid.” Wilken said the injunction will not prevent the NCAA from implementing rules capping the amount of money that may be paid to college athletes while they are enrolled in school, but the NCAA will not be allowed to set the cap below the cost of attendance.

» via CBS Sports

Google can detect child pornography with a widely used digital fingerprinting system — called “hashing” — that allows companies and law enforcement to detect known child pornography in electronic services like Gmail. Google said it has been using hashing since 2008. “Each child sexual abuse image is given a unique digital fingerprint, which enables our systems to identify those pictures, including in Gmail,” a Google spokesman said in an email. “It is important to remember that we only use this technology to identify child sexual abuse imagery, not other email content that could be associated with criminal activity (for example using email to plot a burglary).”

Google Gives Child Pornography Email Evidence to Police - NYTimes.com

"I would say the biggest problem we have is that the law seems to indicate Google needs to censor links to information that is clearly public - links to articles in legally published, truthful news stories. "That is a very dangerous path to go down, and certainly if we want to go down a path where we are going to be censoring history, there is no way we should leave a private company like Google in charge of making those decisions."

BBC News - Wikipedia link hidden by ‘right to be forgotten’