Showing 1215 posts tagged law

The Missouri State Legislature introduced two related bills aimed to update its existing privacy laws to include records for materials including ebooks, electronic documents, streaming video, music, and downloadable audiobooks, as well as the use of using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology. Missouri Governor Jay Nixon approved one of the bills, which will go into effect on August 28, while rejecting the other. Though the privacy of patrons’ library records has traditionally been sacrosanct, digital technology has transformed library services, and many states’ privacy laws have been slow to address records for digital media.

Missouri Extends Protection of Library Records Data to Digital Materials - The Digital Shift

This legislation is about giving consumers more choices and options for their phones,” says our colleague George Slover, senior policy counsel for Consumers Union, about the passing of this bill. “Restoring the option to unlock a phone gives consumers the ability to pick another wireless service without having to give up a perfectly good, working phone for a new one. This legislation can help consumers save some money, and it can help drive competition in both mobile phone technology and wireless service.

Congress Finally Passes Bill To Re-Legalize Cellphone Unlocking – Consumerist

A national lawyers group has drafted a fresh road map for lawmakers across the nation that, if enacted by individual states, would change how survivors gain entry to the “digital assets” of the dead — potentially detouring the age-old, legal blockades used by various social sites. The plan, passed Wednesday by the Uniform Law Commission, would allow family trustees to sign onto the emails of those they’ve lost in order to mop up lingering money matters as well as enter social media platforms to shutter pages that often become unwanted memorials.

Facebook Graveyard: Families Seek Entry Into Digital Lives of the Dead - NBC News.com

"Finally, while it is technically possible for trademark and copyright owners to proceed with civil litigation against the consuming public who affirmatively seek out counterfeited products or pirated content or engage in illegal file sharing, campaigns like this have been expensive, do not yield significant financial returns, and can cause a public relations problem for the plaintiff in addressing its consuming public," the association recommended.

American Bar Association urges against file sharing lawsuits | Ars Technica

Hidden From Google doesn’t automatically archive each website that disappears from searches—instead, it relies on news reports about specific websites that are removed. Any person can submit a link that has been removed from Google, and the site will archive it. That means that the site is far from comprehensive. It only has a couple dozen stories listed thus far. Meanwhile, Google has a backlog of some 50,000 requests. By that measure, the site isn’t perfect—but it is a start. Websites such as Chilling Effects catalog takedown requests from the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, but haven’t yet begun listing sites removed from searches because of right to be forgotten requests.

'Hidden From Google' Remembers the Sites Google Is Forced to Forget | Motherboard

Consumers should be able to use their existing cell phones when they move their service to a new wireless provider,” Leahy said. “With today’s strong bipartisan vote in the Judiciary Committee, I hope the full Senate can soon take up this important legislation that supports consumer rights.

Cell Phone Unlocking Bill Clears Senate Committee | TechCrunch

Emergency phone and internet data laws to be passed

Emergency powers to ensure police and security services can continue to access phone and internet records are being rushed through Parliament.

Prime Minister David Cameron has secured the backing of all three main parties for the highly unusual move.

He said urgent action was needed to protect the public from “criminals and terrorists” after the European Court of Justice struck down existing powers.

But civil liberties campaigners have warned it will invade people’s privacy.

» via BBC

U.S. Privacy Panel Backs N.S.A.’s Internet Tapping

The federal privacy board that sharply criticized the collection of the phone records of Americans by the National Security Agency has come to a starkly different conclusion about the agency’s exploitation of Internet connections in the United States to monitor foreigners communicating with one another abroad.

That program, according to the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, is largely in compliance with both the Constitution and a surveillance law that Congress passed six years ago.

The board, which Congress made an independent agency in 2007 and became fully operational around the time that Edward J. Snowden began releasing a trove of N.S.A. documents, concluded that the agency largely abided by the rules set out by Congress as it gathered the communications of foreigners, a process that necessarily swept in some emails and phone calls involving American citizens.

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

ISPs File Legal Complaint in Europe Over Spying

Seven Internet service providers and non-profit groups from various countries have filed a legal complaint against the British spy agency GCHQ. Their issue: that the clandestine organization broke the law by hacking the computers of Internet companies to access their networks.

The complaint, filed with the Investigatory Powers Tribunal, calls for an end to the spy agency’s targeting of system administrators in order to gain access to the networks of service providers and conduct mass surveillance. The legal action was filed in conjunction with Privacy International, and stems from reports last year that GCHQ hacked employees of the Belgian telecom Belgacom in order to access and compromise critical routers in the company’s infrastructure to monitor the communication of smartphone users that passed through the router.

» via Wired

The network argues that Dish “engages in virtually identical conduct” to Aereo by allowing customers to stream the broadcasts over the Internet. FOX claims that Dish is thus engaging in an illegal public performance and can’t hide behind the defense that it is only providing the equipment for streaming or that it is the subscribers who are doing the transmitting to themselves from their own copies.

Broadcasters Using Aereo Ruling To Try To Shut Down Dish’s Streaming Service – Consumerist