Showing 73 posts tagged iphone

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” the company wrote in the new privacy policy. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.” The move is a major step meant to reassure people that their privacy is safe on Apple devices.

Apple: New iPhones can’t be unlocked — even with a warrant | TheHill

Khan Academy Brings Its 3,500 Educational Videos To The iPhone

Whether or not one believes Khan Academy is helping to reinvent education, it’s hard to dispute the fact that Khan (and now his team) are an educational video-producing machine, or that the platform continues to diversify. In part, that started with the release of its iPad app in March. This week, Khan Academy brought its 3,600 videos to the iPhone.

This means that the company’s learning library is now accessible on the web, tablets and the iPhone and will likely be showing up on Android in the not so distant future. It may not seem particularly shocking given the exploding popularity of mobile, but it does seem notable when put in context.

» via TechCrunch

A number of things came together when the iPhone was released that helped it become a disruptive force for news and journalism: Twitter was one of them, but so was the fact that the device had a half-decent camera that could do stills and video — and the app economy that Apple created made it easy for services and developers to create specific apps for different functions, such as Instagram for sharing photos. But more than anything, the iPhone was the first smartphone that actually felt like a mobile computer rather than a phone, and that made it easier to think of it as a device you could use not just for consuming the news, but for making it.

News has been changed forever by the iPhone — Apple News, Tips and Reviews
Got an iPhone or 3G iPad? Apple is recording your moves

Today at Where 2.0 Pete Warden and I will announce the discovery that your iPhone, and your 3G iPad, is regularly recording the position of your device into a hidden file. Ever since iOS 4 arrived, your device has been storing a long list of locations and time stamps. We’re not sure why Apple is gathering this data, but it’s clearly intentional, as the database is being restored across backups, and even device migrations.

» via O’Reilly Radar

Got an iPhone or 3G iPad? Apple is recording your moves

Today at Where 2.0 Pete Warden and I will announce the discovery that your iPhone, and your 3G iPad, is regularly recording the position of your device into a hidden file. Ever since iOS 4 arrived, your device has been storing a long list of locations and time stamps. We’re not sure why Apple is gathering this data, but it’s clearly intentional, as the database is being restored across backups, and even device migrations.

» via O’Reilly Radar

Weapons in the battle vs. potholes (A Smartphone App)

Currently, most potholes are identified by DPW repair crews dispatched to drive until they find them, Boston Public Works Commissioner Joanne Massaro said. Roughly one in every six potholes that the city fills is reported by the public, via an e-mail, a call to City Hall, or a report made on Citizens Connect, which allows smartphone users to send the city pictures, descriptions, and locations of problems such as graffiti, potholes, and faded crosswalks.

But a new app, called Street Bump, would automatically report potholes to the city by sensing when a car has hit a bump. The app, in development, would be sensitive enough to identify cracks and divots, alerting the city to pavement problems before they become car-crunching craters.

The application relies on two components embedded in iPhones, Android phones, and many other mobile devices: the accelerometer and the Global Positioning System receiver. The accelerometer, which determines the direction and acceleration of a phone’s movement, can be harnessed to identify when a phone resting on a dashboard or in a cupholder in a moving car has hit a bump; the GPS receiver can determine by satellite just where that bump is located.

» via Boston.com

Your Apps Are Watching You

An examination of 101 popular smartphone “apps”—games and other software applications for iPhone and Android phones—showed that 56 transmitted the phone’s unique device ID to other companies without users’ awareness or consent. Forty-seven apps transmitted the phone’s location in some way. Five sent age, gender and other personal details to outsiders.

The findings reveal the intrusive effort by online-tracking companies to gather personal data about people in order to flesh out detailed dossiers on them.

» via The Wall Street Journal (subscription may be required)

Executive Leaves Apple After iPhone Antenna Troubles

Mark Papermaster, the Apple executive in charge of hardware for the company’s flagship iPhone, has left the company in the wake of widely reported problems with the antenna of the recently introduced iPhone 4.

It is not clear if Mr. Papermaster was ousted or left on his own accord.

» via The New York Times

The iPhone 4 Redux: Analyzing Apple’s iOS 4.0.1 Signal Fix & Antenna Issue

The results are conclusive - Apple has dramatically changed the signal strength to signal bar mapping in iOS 4.0.1 and the iOS 4.1 beta, making the dynamic range not only much broader, but the range values for each bar much wider. The range of signals that correspond to bars three and four are the same width, and bar two is only slightly less.
The cutoff value for two bars to one bar remains the same, but every other value has increased. The result is that the worst case drop of 24 dBm no longer makes all the signal bars disappear, but rather two.
AnandTech reader Mike Escoffery, Director of Design and User Experience at Media Platforms, created his own diagram to help compare the old and new way of iOS signal strength reporting.
As you can see the old way (top) put far too much weight into the 5th bar of signal. Apple’s new approach not only splits it up more reasonably between the 4th and 5th bar (still non-linearly keeping you in the 5th bar if possible) but also extends the range of the lower bars.

» via AnandTech

The iPhone 4 Redux: Analyzing Apple’s iOS 4.0.1 Signal Fix & Antenna Issue

The results are conclusive - Apple has dramatically changed the signal strength to signal bar mapping in iOS 4.0.1 and the iOS 4.1 beta, making the dynamic range not only much broader, but the range values for each bar much wider. The range of signals that correspond to bars three and four are the same width, and bar two is only slightly less.

The cutoff value for two bars to one bar remains the same, but every other value has increased. The result is that the worst case drop of 24 dBm no longer makes all the signal bars disappear, but rather two.

AnandTech reader Mike Escoffery, Director of Design and User Experience at Media Platforms, created his own diagram to help compare the old and new way of iOS signal strength reporting.

As you can see the old way (top) put far too much weight into the 5th bar of signal. Apple’s new approach not only splits it up more reasonably between the 4th and 5th bar (still non-linearly keeping you in the 5th bar if possible) but also extends the range of the lower bars.

» via AnandTech

Microsoft exec mocks iPhone 4, dubs it Apple's Vista

A top Microsoft executive today compared Apple’s iPhone 4 to his own company’s problem-plagued Vista operating system.

"It looks like the iPhone 4 might be their Vista, and I’m okay with that," said Kevin Turner, Microsoft’s chief operating officer, in a keynote speech at Microsoft’s Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC), which runs through Thursday in Washington, D.C.

Besides mocking Apple’s iPhone, Turner also touted Windows Phone 7, now slated to reach retail in the U.S. this November on a number of smartphone models.

The iPhone’s position isn’t unassailable, Turner argued. “We’re back in the game,” he said. “And this game is not over.”

» via ComputerWorld

iPhone vs. Android

Vying for their share of the smartphone market are two of the tech industry’s fiercest competitors:  Apple, with its iconic iPhone, and Google, with its fast-growing Android operating system. 
Between Q4 ’09 and Q1 ’10, Android and iPhone’s share of the smartphone market grew by 2% each. At the same time, smartphone leader Blackberry lost 2% share to fall to 35% of all smartphones while Microsoft’s Windows Mobile OS also lost 2% to fall to 19%.

» via nielsenwire High-res

iPhone vs. Android

Vying for their share of the smartphone market are two of the tech industry’s fiercest competitors:  Apple, with its iconic iPhone, and Google, with its fast-growing Android operating system. 

Between Q4 ’09 and Q1 ’10, Android and iPhone’s share of the smartphone market grew by 2% each. At the same time, smartphone leader Blackberry lost 2% share to fall to 35% of all smartphones while Microsoft’s Windows Mobile OS also lost 2% to fall to 19%.

» via nielsenwire