As the digital transition upends the industry, resistance to on-demand printing may fade. Smaller publishers that have already made the switch away from printing and storing their own books say it’s well worth it. “Instead of putting all those books in a warehouse, you free up cash flow to invest in R&D,” says Laura Baldwin, president of O’Reilly Media, a publisher of technical books that moved to print on demand last year and shed $1.6 million in inventory cost. “You can invest in the technical future of publishing as opposed to printed books that are sitting in the warehouse.”

Amazon vs. Publishers: The Book Battle Continues - Businessweek
New RFID Tag Could Mean the End of Bar Codes

Lines at the grocery store might become as obsolete as milkmen, if a new tag that seeks to replace bar codes becomes commonplace.
Researchers from Sunchon National University in Suncheon, South Korea, and Rice University in Houston have built a radio frequency identification tag that can be printed directly onto cereal boxes and potato chip bags. The tag uses ink laced with carbon nanotubes to print electronics on paper or plastic that could instantly transmit information about a cart full of groceries.
“You could run your cart by a detector and it tells you instantly what’s in the cart,” says James M. Tour of Rice University, whose research group invented the ink. “No more lines, you just walk out with your stuff.”

» via Wired High-res

New RFID Tag Could Mean the End of Bar Codes

Lines at the grocery store might become as obsolete as milkmen, if a new tag that seeks to replace bar codes becomes commonplace.

Researchers from Sunchon National University in Suncheon, South Korea, and Rice University in Houston have built a radio frequency identification tag that can be printed directly onto cereal boxes and potato chip bags. The tag uses ink laced with carbon nanotubes to print electronics on paper or plastic that could instantly transmit information about a cart full of groceries.

“You could run your cart by a detector and it tells you instantly what’s in the cart,” says James M. Tour of Rice University, whose research group invented the ink. “No more lines, you just walk out with your stuff.”

» via Wired