A new internet safety report from Ofcom detailing network filters has revealed that the majority of the United Kingdom has opted into being able to view pornography online. Only very small percentages of UK ISP customers have opted to use porn filters; 4% of Virgin Media customers, 5% of BT, and 8% of Sky. However, the numbers only tally new customers that are offered the choice of the filters during account activation, and don’t make note of customers who may decide to turn on the filters at a later date. Ofcom found that around 42% of internet-enabled homes already had broadband filters, so perhaps customers simply didn’t want to double down on internet censorship.

Almost all of England actively chose to view internet porn | News | Geek.com

What if the public speech on Facebook and Twitter is more akin to a conversation happening between two people at a restaurant? Or two people speaking quietly at home, albeit near a window that happens to be open to the street? And if more than a billion people are active on various social networking applications each week, are we saying that there are now a billion public figures? When did we agree to let media redefine everyone who uses social networks as fair game, with no recourse and no framework for consent?

What Is Public? — The Message — Medium

The executive branch will not eavesdrop on the computer keystrokes and Internet use of members of Congress and legislative staff members with security clearances as part of its stepped-up efforts to prevent unauthorized disclosures of classified information, the nation’s top intelligence official told lawmakers on Friday.

Web Use to Be Unmonitored for Congress - NYTimes.com

The 10-day block comes after anonymous changes were made to entries on politicians and businesses, as well as events like the Kennedy assassination. The biography of former US defence secretary Donald Rumsfeld was edited to say that he was an “alien lizard”.

BBC News - Wikipedia blocks ‘disruptive’ page edits from US Congress

American Facebook users spend way more time on the social network than exercising. Mark Zuckerberg said today on Facebook’s Q2 earnings call that “people on Facebook in the US spend around 40 minutes each day using our service”, while the CDC recommends Americans exercise 21 minutes a day but only 20% of people meet that goal.

American Users Spend An Average Of 40 Minutes Per Day On Facebook | TechCrunch

Using images of cats uploaded to photosharing services, including Flickr, Twitpic and Instagram, Mr. Mundy extracted latitude and longitude coordinates that many modern cameras, especially those in smartphones, attach to each image. His site displays random images from a sample of one million of the many millions of pictures tagged with the word “cat” online. The images are displayed on a map using satellite imagery, with nearby cat photos also visible. Specific street addresses are not displayed, but the geographic information can leave few details to the imagination in rural areas.

What the Internet Can See From Your Cat Pictures - NYTimes.com

More than 5% of the sites they surveyed had turned to a technique known as “canvas fingerprinting” to identify visitors. This technique forces a web browser to create a hidden image. Subtle differences in the set-up of a computer mean almost every machine will render the image in a different way enabling that device to be identified consistently. Popular sites using the technique included the White House, the San Francisco Chronicle’s website and the YouPorn pornographic portal.

BBC News - Browser ‘fingerprints’ help track users

If you pay for a phone in the US, you’ll find a small addendum each month: a few dollars for the Universal Service Fund, a federal program meant to give rural and low-income Americans phone and internet access. A fraction of that money goes to a system called E-Rate, which is specifically earmarked for bringing schools and libraries online. And today, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has pushed through an attempt to reform the 18-year-old program by putting billions of dollars towards Wi-Fi over the next few years.

FCC approves multibillion-dollar push to put Wi-Fi in schools and libraries | The Verge

Google has powerful data to see exactly what the audience wants, and produce news-on-demand. The entire world was searching for Neymar — Brazil’s superstar player who sat out after fracturing a vertebra. Google could have looked for related search terms, and created content for people to grieve or laugh. I ask the team why they wouldn’t use a negative headline. Many headlines are negative. “We’re also quite keen not to rub salt into the wounds,” producer Sam Clohesy says, “and a negative story about Brazil won’t necessarily get a lot of traction in social.”

In Google Newsroom, Brazil Defeat Is Not A Headline : All Tech Considered : NPR