There’s data tied up in paper records that goes all the way back to the lat 1800s,” says Theodore Allen, a graduate student at the University of Miami and IEDRO volunteer. “So rather than working on observations from 1960 to present, we can work on things from 1880 to present.” With that kind of information, climate scientists can make their models far more reliable. The problem is that nobody wants to spend the time and money it takes to scan and input 100 million pieces of pieces of old, musky, often disorganized paper. “You’ll show up to a place and you need dust masks on for days at a time,” says Allen. “You’re crouched over running through dusty, dirty weather records in a damp room. It’s not very glamorous.

The Quest to Scan Millions of Weather Records - The Atlantic

This is a pivotal time for our communications ecosystem. As we cede control to governments and corporations—and as they take it away from us—we are risking a most fundamental liberty, the ability to freely speak and assemble. Let’s not trade our freedom for convenience.

The New Editors of the Internet - The Atlantic

If you take the last two months of what’s happened in Egypt for example, and you search every country’s history for the periods in the past that are most similar to right now, and then you look at what happened after all those periods, that gives you a pretty good estimate of what happens next.

BBC News - Can computers replace historians?

For the first time ever Google is now processing an average of one million removal requests per day. The new record follows an upward trend with copyright holders reporting more and more allegedly infringing search results in an effort to deter piracy.

Google Asked to Remove 1 Million Pirate Links Per Day | TorrentFreak

Everyone always wants to know the answer to the same question, ‘How long do CDs last? What’s the average age?’ " Youket says. But "there is no average, because there is no average disc.

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever : All Tech Considered : NPR

The future — of news, of storytelling, of knowing — has to, in some way, address this. The methods by which we filter and evaluate and accumulate information need to be transparent and readily interrogated. Not because openness is a panacea — it isn’t — but because knowing something is an iterative process which depends upon collaboration, and collaboration can’t happen in a dark room.

Byron the bulb: how the velocity of journalism is changing | The Verge (via thisistheverge)

(via thisistheverge)

Veracity aside, the whole debate is a good reminder of what most what most of us cheerfully Snapchatting, Instagramming fools conveniently forget: Our phones store metadata with every photo we take. Unless you spend a lot more energy than most people finding tools that scrub your files, EXIF data on every selfie includes the GPS coordinates of your photos, the time they were taken, and enough other information that makes it easy to track down personalized details about you. Even if there’s no embedded EXIF data, if a photo’s location is placed on a map, software can scrape those locations and associate them with the images. The impact this has on our privacy is profound. Programmer and artist Owen Mundy recently visualized these kinds of privacy issues in his project, I Know Where Your Cat Lives. Using publicly available photos from people’s feeds, he locates photos of cats on a global map, with an estimated error margin of 7.8 meters. “I have a daughter and had been posting pictures of her on Instagram,” Mundy told Vice. “Then I realized Instagram had created a map of every picture I had been sharing with the world. That scared me.”

In Metadata We Trust, Minus The Margins Of Error | Popular Science

The measure would request that the president to trim the amount of classified information by at least 10 percent within five years, in addition to granting the Merit Systems Protection Board authority to hear cases from employees who have been deemed ineligible for security clearance and establishing a congressional stance that only positions involving access to classified information should require clearance, among other actions. The government spends more than $11 billion classifying more than 80 million documents each year, according to a 2013 report from the National Archives and Records Administration.

Does the government have a problem with ‘runaway’ document classification? - The Washington Post

How did a joke we made up about Amelia Bedelia while we were stoned get repeated all over the Internet for more than five years, by blogs and reporters and elementary school students and even the author of Amelia Bedelia himself?

I accidentally started a Wikipedia hoax

It struck me that part of the reason we always stay jacked in is that we want everyone — at the other end of the phone, on Facebook and Twitter, on the web, on email — to know that we are part of the now. If we look away, we worry we will disappear.

David Carr, writing eloquently as usual about the death of print. (via parislemon)