A new analysis from the San Francisco Fed finds entry-level earnings for new college grads — defined as working graduates age 21 to 25 — grew only by 6 percent from April 2007 to April 2014. In comparison, median weekly earnings for all workers grew two-and-a-half times as fast, at 15 percent. And while recent grads tend to fall behind after any recession, the gap since the Great Recession has been both wide and long-lasting.

Young college grads’ wage growth is falling farther and farther behind - Vox

“I wanted to give freshmen more control over the process, first because we’d have fewer roommate changes,” Mr. Austin told me, “but also because, if students were more invested in that roommate, they would try harder to work things out before they requested a roommate change.” In fact, he says, letting students participate in selecting their roommates may play a more significant role in residential harmony than the matching algorithm itself. Among incoming Lowell students who found a roommate on RoomSync last year, about 1 percent later asked to change rooms. Among those who tried the app but did not choose a roommate on it, the figure was 4 percent. Among those who did not try the app at all, it was about 8 percent.

Avoiding Roommate Shock, Online - NYTimes.com

I think we are in the initial phase of the next evolutionary step of the librarian as liaison. I touched upon this in my last post about the shift from “knowledge service provider to collaborative partner.” ARL is also focusing on “new roles for new times” exploring the move from a collections-centric to an engagement-centered model. And recently a paper from Ithaka (Anne Kenney, Cornell) builds upon this theme by outlining how librarians are becoming more embedded in the research life of campus. This includes things like technology development, data services, grant assistance, and publishing support.

A Liaison for a Classroom Building? Curating a Learning ecosystem. - The Ubiquitous Librarian - The Chronicle of Higher Education

We got a group together and said what we wanted to do, and the administration just said, ‘O.K., ask for any equipment or advice you need,’ ” said Colleen Perry, who is studying bioengineering. “We’ve definitely made mistakes, but it’s probably the first time in our lives that we’re not getting a grade and we don’t have anyone telling us what to do.

A Classroom Leaves the Syllabus to the Students - NYTimes.com

A new study of over 1300 3rd to 5th graders found that parental monitoring of children’s media has ripple effects that extend across several different areas of children’s lives out into the future. For this study, my colleagues and I talked to children, their parents, their teachers, and even their school nurses, once at the beginning and once at the end of a school year. e asked parents whether they set limits on the amount of screen time their children were allowed to have each day, and also on the content of media their children were allowed access to. As one might expect, setting limits on the amount and content of children’s media is generally effective at reducing time on TV and video games and at reducing violent media exposure. However, seven months later we got a huge surprise. Children whose parents set more limits on the amount and content of media were now getting more sleep, had gained less weight (lowering their risk of obesity), were getting better grades in school, exhibited more helpful and cooperative social behaviors in school, and were less aggressive with their peers (as seen by the classroom teachers).

Kids on Screen-Time Diet Lost Weight and Got Better Grades - Scientific American

At Carnegie Mellon University, 40 percent of incoming freshmen to the School of Computer Science are women, the largest group ever. At the University of Washington, another technology powerhouse, women earned 30 percent of computer science degrees this year. At Harvey Mudd College, 40 percent of computer science majors are women, and this year, women represented more than half of the engineering graduates for the first time.

Some Universities Crack Code in Drawing Women to Computer Science - NYTimes.com

We know that students do not make optimal choices when directing their own learning; especially when they’re new to a subject, they need guidance from an experienced teacher. We know that students do not learn deeply or lastingly when they have a world of distractions at their fingertips. And we know that students learn best not as isolated units but as part of a socially connected group. Modest as it is from a technological perspective, MIT BLOSSOMS is ideally designed for learning—a reminder that more and better technology does not always lead to more and better education.

An MIT Learning Program Challenges Many Ed-Tech Assumptions | MindShift

By pushing big questions about K-12 teaching to the margins and assigning them solely to education specialists, institutions of higher education became complicit in trends that continue to make public education more separate and more unequal. This silence has had a disproportionately negative impact in poorer urban communities. The type of liberally educated teacher who once commonly taught in economically diverse public schools now migrates toward private institutions or to affluent suburbs. Meanwhile, policies that emphasize vocational “readiness” — at the expense of curiosity, creativity, and critical thinking — communicate a dispiriting message of doubt to disadvantaged students who might benefit most from these educational virtues.

Liberal arts faculty need to get more involved in teacher education (essay) @insidehighered

“We are persuaded that to deny UT Austin its limited use of race in its search for holistic diversity would hobble the richness of the educational experience in contradiction of the plain teachings of Bakke and Grutter,” wrote Judge Patrick E. Higginbotham in the decision.

U. of Texas Affirmative-Action Program Is Upheld by Appeals Court – The Ticker - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

At the end of the testing week, Lewis went back to the testing office with Crystal Draper, a language-arts teacher. For about an hour, they erased wrong answers and bubbled in the right ones. They exchanged no words. Lewis couldn’t even look at her. “I couldn’t believe what we’d been reduced to,” he said. He tried to stay focussed on the mechanics of the work: he took care to change, at most, one or two answers for every ten questions. “I had a minor in statistics, and it’s not that hard to figure out windows of probability,” he told me. Many students were on the cusp of passing, and he gave them a little nudge, so that they would pass by one or two points.

Rachel Aviv: A Middle-School Cheating Scandal Raises Questions About No Child Left Behind : The New Yorker