Showing 753 posts tagged data

While most providers have installed some kind of electronic record system, two recent studies have found that fewer than half of the nation’s hospitals can transmit a patient care document, while only 14 percent of physicians can exchange patient data with outside hospitals or other providers. “We’ve spent half a million dollars on an electronic health record system about three years ago, and I’m faxing all day long. I can’t send anything electronically over it,” said Dr. William L. Rich III, a member of a nine-person ophthalmology practice in Northern Virginia and medical director of health policy for the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Doctors Hit a Snag In the Rush to Connect - NYTimes.com

Already the new phone has led to an eruption from the director of the F.B.I., James B. Comey. At a news conference on Thursday devoted largely to combating terror threats from the Islamic State, Mr. Comey said, “What concerns me about this is companies marketing something expressly to allow people to hold themselves beyond the law.” He cited kidnapping cases, in which exploiting the contents of a seized phone could lead to finding a victim, and predicted there would be moments when parents would come to him “with tears in their eyes, look at me and say, ‘What do you mean you can’t’ ” decode the contents of a phone. “The notion that someone would market a closet that could never be opened — even if it involves a case involving a child kidnapper and a court order — to me does not make any sense.”

Signaling Post-Snowden Era, New iPhone Locks Out N.S.A. - NYTimes.com

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” the company wrote in the new privacy policy. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.” The move is a major step meant to reassure people that their privacy is safe on Apple devices.

Apple: New iPhones can’t be unlocked — even with a warrant | TheHill

The most recent example of how stark the differences can be between a filtered feed and an unfiltered one was the unrest in Ferguson, Mo. and how that showed up so dramatically on Twitter but was barely present for most users of Facebook. As sociologist Zeynep Tufekci noted, that kind of filtering has social consequences — and journalism professor Emily Bell pointed out that doing this makes Facebook and Twitter into information gatekeepers in much the same way newspapers used to be.

Twitter CFO says a Facebook-style filtered feed is coming, whether you like it or not — Tech News and Analysis (via slantback)

(via slantback)

Just the way the smart home has single-purpose devices as opposed to overall intelligent systems, the development of intelligent roads, athletes and any other system made up of multiple components will feature single-purpose sensors for years before we ever get to unified systems– if we ever get to unified systems. This is unfortunate for consumers who will have to wrangle many apps and also because having multiple platforms can slow the pace of innovation, but thankfully sensors are getting cheaper and we can at least fulfill some of the promise of the internet of things while we wait for an eventual standard or service to unify things to arrive.

Interesting thoughts about sensors and the Internet of Things standardization and growth. (from: We will drown in sensors before we ever build a true internet of things — Tech News and Analysis)

(via analyticisms)

There’s data tied up in paper records that goes all the way back to the lat 1800s,” says Theodore Allen, a graduate student at the University of Miami and IEDRO volunteer. “So rather than working on observations from 1960 to present, we can work on things from 1880 to present.” With that kind of information, climate scientists can make their models far more reliable. The problem is that nobody wants to spend the time and money it takes to scan and input 100 million pieces of pieces of old, musky, often disorganized paper. “You’ll show up to a place and you need dust masks on for days at a time,” says Allen. “You’re crouched over running through dusty, dirty weather records in a damp room. It’s not very glamorous.

The Quest to Scan Millions of Weather Records - The Atlantic

Everyone always wants to know the answer to the same question, ‘How long do CDs last? What’s the average age?’ " Youket says. But "there is no average, because there is no average disc.

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever : All Tech Considered : NPR

The future — of news, of storytelling, of knowing — has to, in some way, address this. The methods by which we filter and evaluate and accumulate information need to be transparent and readily interrogated. Not because openness is a panacea — it isn’t — but because knowing something is an iterative process which depends upon collaboration, and collaboration can’t happen in a dark room.

Byron the bulb: how the velocity of journalism is changing | The Verge (via thisistheverge)

(via thisistheverge)

It’s dangerous to assume that numbers tell the whole story. It’s better to think of data not as a smoking gun, but as a trail of breadcrumbs. Metrics can point you toward problem areas or alert you to a potential issue that you might not have otherwise noticed.

We definitely agree with this statement in a pretty good article about metrics pitfalls: 5 Measurement Pitfalls to Avoid. (via analyticisms)

(via unionmetrics)

General Electric plans to announce Monday that it has created a “data lake” method of analyzing sensor information from industrial machinery in places like railroads, airlines, hospitals and utilities. G.E. has been putting sensors on everything it can for a couple of years, and now it is out to read all that information quickly. The company, working with an outfit called Pivotal, said that in the last three months it has looked at information from 3.4 million miles of flights by 24 airlines using G.E. jet engines. G.E. said it figured out things like possible defects 2,000 times as fast as it could before. The company has to, since it’s getting so much more data. “In 10 years, 17 billion pieces of equipment will have sensors,” said William Ruh, vice president of G.E. software. “We’re only one-tenth of the way there.”

What Cars Did for Today’s World, Data May Do for Tomorrow’s - NYTimes.com