Showing 739 posts tagged data

RFID tracking chips will be placed on every player at some point this season—two of them—to allow the NFL to measure something the NBA and NASCAR don’t: player orientation. Is this a way to improve the fan experience, or is it just creating data for data’s sake?

The NFL Announces It’s Tracking RFID Chips On Every Player For 2014 ⚙ Co.Labs ⚙ code community

The Missouri State Legislature introduced two related bills aimed to update its existing privacy laws to include records for materials including ebooks, electronic documents, streaming video, music, and downloadable audiobooks, as well as the use of using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology. Missouri Governor Jay Nixon approved one of the bills, which will go into effect on August 28, while rejecting the other. Though the privacy of patrons’ library records has traditionally been sacrosanct, digital technology has transformed library services, and many states’ privacy laws have been slow to address records for digital media.

Missouri Extends Protection of Library Records Data to Digital Materials - The Digital Shift

In general, whenever you’re analyzing a data set you really need to think about: how was it created, what biases or assumptions went into creating that data set; In the same way, when you’re reading somebody else’s data journalism, you really need to think through what assumptions were made in that model or in that analysis. And of course, we can’t do that if we don’t have a citizenry and a group of journalists who are sufficiently literate in algorithms and analysis to be critically literate.

New York Times Chief Data Scientist Chris Wiggins On The Way We Create And Consume Content Now | Fast Company | Business Innovation

Using images of cats uploaded to photosharing services, including Flickr, Twitpic and Instagram, Mr. Mundy extracted latitude and longitude coordinates that many modern cameras, especially those in smartphones, attach to each image. His site displays random images from a sample of one million of the many millions of pictures tagged with the word “cat” online. The images are displayed on a map using satellite imagery, with nearby cat photos also visible. Specific street addresses are not displayed, but the geographic information can leave few details to the imagination in rural areas.

What the Internet Can See From Your Cat Pictures - NYTimes.com

It turns out that all that de-identified data may not be so anonymous after all.

So argues Arvind Narayanan, a Princeton computer scientist who first made waves in the privacy community by co-authoring a 2006 paper showing that Netflix users and their entire rental histories could be identified by cross-referencing supposedly anonymous Netflix ratings with the Internet Movie Database. Narayanan and fellow Princeton professor Edward Felten delivered the latest blow to the case of de-identification proponents (those who maintain that de-identification is viable) with a July 9 paper that makes a serious case for data paranoia.

They argue that de-identification doesn’t work—in theory or in practice—and that those who say it does are promoting a “false sense of security” by naively underestimating the attackers who might try to deduce personal information from big data.

Here’s why you may never be truly anonymous in a big data world - Quartz

Emergency phone and internet data laws to be passed

Emergency powers to ensure police and security services can continue to access phone and internet records are being rushed through Parliament.

Prime Minister David Cameron has secured the backing of all three main parties for the highly unusual move.

He said urgent action was needed to protect the public from “criminals and terrorists” after the European Court of Justice struck down existing powers.

But civil liberties campaigners have warned it will invade people’s privacy.

» via BBC

For Citizenme, the price you pay is much higher, and it’s trying to shift internet economics back in your direction. The long-term plan is to provide a way for you to sell your own online data directly to advertisers and others of your choosing. But it isn’t there just yet. In the meantime, it’s focused on helping you collect and analyze your social media data through a mobile app that connects to multiple social networks—giving you more insight into how things work today. “The very first step is raising awareness, helping people understand what’s being done with their data,” says Citizenme founder StJohn Deakins.

The App That Lets You Spy on Yourself and Sell Your Own Data | Enterprise | WIRED

Under the changes to the law about personal data protection, email addresses and messages are now considered personal data. Any organisation that stores or processes such data will have to maintain physical servers in Russia, and tell Roskomnadzor where exactly those servers are located. “While collecting personal data, including by means of the Internet, an operator should provide recording, systematization, storage and update of the Russian citizen’s personal data using databases located in the territory of the Russian Federation,” reads the new law.

Russian Government Will Force Companies To Store Citizen Data Locally From 2016

We can’t yet see how much this will change things. The proliferation of imaging is a profound change that bears comparison with the way vinyl and especially the transistor took music everywhere two and three generations ago, or the way the steam press and railways took print everywhere in the 19th century.

Benedict Evans: Imaging (via davemorin)

(via davemorin)

How much information is stored inside a human? Not as much as you think. All you need is a mere 1.5 gigabytes to fit your entire genetic code. Veritasium did the math in his latest brain tapping video and cooked up that number using bits to understand the molecules that make up a person’s genetic code. Of course, we have a lot of cells in our body (around 40 trillion) and each of those cells contain the full 1.5 GB of our genetic code. So a real person has about 60 zettabytes (60 with 21 zeroes after) of information in total. Thats huge. Veritasium says that in the year 2020, all the digital information in the world will only tally up to 40 ZB. So turns out, there’s a lot of information necessary to make a person. But! 99.9% of our genetic information is shared with everyone else on Earth. What makes us unique is much, much smaller than a ZB. In fact, it takes less than a megabyte to make a person different from the next. So there it is. A reasonable 1.5GB of information for our genetic code. A ridiculous 60ZB flowing in all our bodies. And an embarrassingly tiny megabyte that makes us believe we’re a unique snowflake.

How many gigabytes does it take to make a human? (via myserendipities)

(via myserendipities)