According to a paper titled “Digital Language Death,” just published in PLOS One, less than five percent of the 7,000 languages spoken today will ascend to the digital realm. Granted, languages have been dying as long as they’ve been spoken, but the Endangered Languages Project reports that “the pace at which languages are disappearing today has no precedent and is alarming.” András Kornai, author of the new paper, blames the internet for why we’re more likely to be speaking French than, say, Mandinka, in the future.

The Internet Is Killing Most Languages | Motherboard

It is well known that America’s military dominates both the air and the sea. What’s less celebrated is that the US has also dominated the spectrum, a feat that is just as critical to the success of operations. Communications, navigation, battlefield logistics, precision munitions—all of these depend on complete and unfettered access to the spectrum, territory that must be vigilantly defended from enemy combatants. Having command of electromagnetic waves allows US forces to operate drones from a hemisphere away, guide cruise missiles inland from the sea, and alert patrols to danger on the road ahead. Just as important, blocking enemies from using the spectrum is critical to hindering their ability to cause mayhem, from detonating roadside bombs to organizing ambushes. As tablet computers and semiautonomous robots proliferate on battlefields in the years to come, spectrum dominance will only become more critical. Without clear and reliable access to the electromagnetic realm, many of America’s most effective weapons simply won’t work.

Inside the New Arms Race to Control Bandwidth on the Battlefield | Threat Level | Wired.com

You can make a strong argument that Tim Berners-Lee and the dozen people who were involved at various critical stages of the development of the web did more good than all the foreign aid workers and all the liberal military interventions over the past 50 years.

Nick Denton
http://playboysfw.kinja.com/the-playboy-interview-a-candid-conversation-with-gawke-1527302145 (via fred-wilson)

Books themselves are perhaps the first chatbots: long-winded and poor listeners, they nonetheless have the power to make the reader feel known, understood, challenged, spurred to greatness, not alone. On the other hand, we might notice that writing, the medium of literature and the Turing Test, leaves out much of what makes language tick: timing, prosody, emphasis, tone. Language is more than libretto; we shouldn’t settle for the sheet music when we can have the performance.

Brian Christian on Spike Jonze’s “Her” and the digital world’s intimacy: http://nyr.kr/1drVhOz (via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

"We have seen so many privacy-oriented companies come and go," he says. "And I am not talking about a handful; I’m talking about hundreds of companies that offered services like, you could shop confidentially, you could ship confidentially. Not a single one has succeeded in the market." Until now — with Snapchat.

Teens Dig Digital Privacy, If Snapchat Is Any Indication : All Tech Considered : NPR

At least 7,776 languages are in use in the greater offline world … Less than five percent of languages in use now exist online.

How the Internet is killing the world’s languages (via courtenaybird)

(via courtenaybird)

Technology to me does two things: it increases the velocity of communication and increases the number of people who can participate. That’s it. That’s really all technology for our entire history has ever done.

Jack Dorsey (via PandoDaily)

Twitter is faster and HuffPo more sophisticated, but the parasitic dynamics of networked media were fully functional in the 19th century. For proof, look no further than the Infectious Texts project, a collaboration of humanities scholars and computer scientists. The project expects to launch by the end of the month. When it does, researchers and the public will be able to comb through widely reprinted texts identified by mining 41,829 issues of 132 newspapers from the Library of Congress. While this first stage focuses on texts from before the Civil War, the project eventually will include the later 19th century and expand to include magazines and other publications, says Ryan Cordell, an assistant professor of English at Northeastern University and a leader of the project.

Here’s How Memes Went Viral — In the 1800s - Wired Science

"Reaction to disappointment and reality testing occurs more quickly face to face," Sandberg said in a statement. "There is a narrowness with texting and you don’t get to see the breadth of a person that you need to see." The pair surveyed 276 young adults around the country; 38% were in a serious relationship, 46% engaged, and 16% were married. One big (and, yes, obvious) takeaway from the study is that text messages are a standard way of communicating for most couples: 82% traded texts multiple times per day.

Study: Couples Who Text Together Don’t Stay Together | Fast Company | Business Innovation

If you look at the nature of those one-sentence letters, you can see that most of the time it’s something that came to somebody’s mind, walking down the street, and they sent it out. If they’d thought about it for two minutes, they wouldn’t have sent it.

The Daily Dot - Noam Chomsky explains how the Internet made us stupid