Naturally, not everyone in China loves the idea of foreign professors teaching China’s history. “Harvard’s China history course is open to the whole world. This is not a good news,” wrote one viewer on Youku.com, China’s Youtube-like video platform. “Now the world gets to know China through the interpretation of Westerners.”

That’s partially the point, journalist Christopher Lydon seems to be saying during his introduction in the course’s trailer. “If you are not Chinese, this course will give you an alternative world view…And if you are Chinese, you are going to see your way of life, your culture, your history and your present in a different mirror.”

Harvard is teaching the Chinese their own history - Quartz

My belief is not that one shouldn’t go to college,” said Bock. It is that among 18- to 22-year-olds — or people returning to school years later — “most don’t put enough thought into why they’re going, and what they want to get out of it.” Of course, we want an informed citizenry, where everyone has a baseline of knowledge from which to build skills. That is a social good. But, he added, don’t just go to college because you think it is the right thing to do and that any bachelor’s degree will suffice. “The first and most important thing is to be explicit and willful in making the decisions about what you want to get out of this investment in your education.” It’s a huge investment of time, effort and money and people should think “incredibly hard about what they’re getting in return.

How to Get a Job at Google, Part 2 - NYTimes.com

Discontinuing the ‘free’ certificates has been one of the most difficult decisions we’ve made,” wrote Sebastian Thrun, Udacity’s founder, in a blog post about the policy change. “We know that many of our hardworking students can’t afford to pay for classes. At the same time, we cannot hope that our certificates will ever carry great value if we don’t make this change.

Udacity Will No Longer Offer Free Certificates – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Lawmakers back Tennessee Promise plan for free tuition

Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal to provide free community college received the overwhelming endorsement of state lawmakers Tuesday night, passing the House of Representatives on an 87-8 vote.

The House joined the Senate in approving “Tennessee Promise,” the plan Haslam laid out in February to cover the full cost of two-year college for every high school graduate starting in fall 2015.

» via The Tennessean

Unfortunately, most teachers are not in a position to share excitement with students. About 70% are classified as disengaged, which puts them on par with the workforce as a whole. This is surprising in some ways, because teachers score close to the top on measures that indicate that they find meaning in their life and see work as a calling. Unfortunately, the structures that teachers are working in–which may include high-stakes standardized testing and value-added formulas that evaluate their performance based on outside factors–seem to tug against their happiness. “The real bummer is they don’t feel their opinions matter,” Busteed says. K-12 teachers scored dead last among 12 occupational groups in agreeing with the statement that their opinions count at work, and also dead last on “My supervisor creates an open and trusting environment.” K-12 teachers scored dead last among 12 occupational groups in agreeing with the statement that their opinions count at work, and also dead last on “My supervisor creates an open and trusting environment.”

How Engaged Are Students and Teachers in American Schools? | MindShift

What we’re concerned about is the death spiral — this continuing downward momentum for some institutions,” said Susan Fitzgerald, an analyst at Moody’s Investors Service in New York. “We will see more closures than in the past.

Small U.S. Colleges Battle Death Spiral as Enrollment Drops - Bloomberg

"When you are dealing with so many different sources of information and so many different offices that need to be involved in the response to a problem, there has to be a reporting structure that brings it all together," Mr. McRobbie says. The changes mean that the university now has uniform response procedures—a tool kit, Mr. Bruhn calls it—that can be applied to cybersecurity and physical-security incidents alike. "It is that structure that provides us with a huge amount of comfort because we know even if it is a one-off sort of incident, we have a structure that is amoeba-like enough that it can cover just about anything that can happen," he says.

Indiana U. Puts IT and Safety Under One Umbrella - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The part-timers are often considered “invisible faculty,” because they rarely participate in academic life and typically bolt from campus the moment class ends. That researchers still know little about them — or how well they do their jobs — is especially startling given that a little more than half of all college faculty members are now part-timers, and they far outnumber full-time faculty members on most community college campuses.

The College Faculty Crisis - NYTimes.com