On Monday, Facebook will roll out a rebuilt ad platform, called Atlas, that will allow marketers to tap its detailed knowledge of its users to direct ads to those people on thousands of other websites and mobile apps. “We are bringing all of the people-based marketing functions that marketers are used to doing on Facebook and allowing them to do that across the web,” David Jakubowski, the company’s head of advertising technology, said in an interview. Continue reading the main story RELATED COVERAGE Bits Blog: Turning Users Into Customers at FacebookAUG. 4, 2014 Bits Daily Report: Mobile Advertising Lifts Profit at FacebookJULY 24, 2014 Bits Blog: After Uproar, European Regulators Question Facebook on Psychological TestingJULY 2, 2014 State of the Art: The Future of Facebook May Not Say ‘Facebook’APRIL 16, 2014 For example, if PepsiCo, one of the first advertisers to sign on to the service, wanted to reach college age men with ads for its Mountain Dew Baja Blast, it could use Atlas to identify several million of those potential customers and show each of them a dozen ads for the soft drink on game apps, sports and video sites. Atlas would also provide Pepsi with information to help it assess which ads were the most effective.

With New Ad Platform, Facebook Opens Gates to Its Vault of User Data - NYTimes.com

We’re talking about censorship: deliberately making a book hard or impossible to get, ‘disappearing’ an author,” Ms. Le Guin wrote in an email. “Governments use censorship for moral and political ends, justifiable or not. Amazon is using censorship to gain total market control so they can dictate to publishers what they can publish, to authors what they can write, to readers what they can buy. This is more than unjustifiable, it is intolerable.

Literary Lions Unite in Protest Over Amazon’s E-Book Tactics - NYTimes.com

Digital sales of all kinds now make up about 68 percent of total sales revenue for the recorded music industry. Streaming outlets, which include “on-demand” services like Spotify, Rhapsody and Google Play Music All Access; Internet radio like Pandora and iHeartRadio; and even video services that use music, are now 27 percent of the whole. According to the report, 7.8 million people in the United States paid for subscriptions to digital services (up from 6.1 million at the end of last year).

Music Sales Drop 5%, as Habits Shift Online - NYTimes.com

Harvard called on corporate leaders to help solve America’s wealth gap by working to buttress the kindergarten-to-12th-grade education system, skills-training programs, and transportation infrastructure, among other things.

Wealth Gap ‘Unsustainable,’ but May Get Worse, Harvard Says - NBC News.com

It turns out that employers evaluate applicants who attended two-year community colleges and those who attended for-profit colleges about equally. Community colleges, in other words, open just as many doors to possibility as for-profit ones. Darolia and his colleagues then tested whether employers displayed a preference for applicants who went to for-profit colleges versus applicants with no college at all. They didn’t. Employers treated people with high school diplomas and coursework at for-profit colleges equivalently.

For-Profit Colleges Are Equivalent to High School - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society

“We’re trying to create an island, I hope, of economic and literary sanity,” Mr. MacArthur said. He feels he is no longer alone in that endeavor. “The world is coming back in the direction of paywalls, and of print,” he said. A number of publishers have indeed been drawn back to glossy pages and the smell of ink. “It is the joy of being at an intimate, nice dinner, where the table is well set, and six or seven people are having an informed and elegant conversation, instead of being in a gym with 10,000 people yelling,” said Tyler Brûlé, the publisher of the international culture magazine Monocle, which makes about 70 percent of its money from print. A magazine, Mr. Brûlé said, is a contemplative experience, perhaps best enjoyed in physical form, untethered from the need to charge batteries. It is also a label, he said, to be displayed proudly, like designer luggage.

Harper’s Publisher Standing Firm in His Defense of Print and Paywall - NYTimes.com

In the last decade, newspapers’ weekday circulation has fallen 47 percent, ads have fallen 55 percent, and about seven in ten newspaper readers are now older than 45. Stats like these provide the background music to events of the last few months, when News Corp, Time Warner, Gannett, the Tribune Company, and E. W. Scripps all unloaded their journalism divisions. Including the Washington Post’s sale within the last 12 months, this means that seven of the ten largest newspapers in the country have been dumped in an annus horribilis for print.

A Terrible Year for Newspapers, a Good Year for News - The Atlantic

“On the list of companies that mistreat their suppliers, Amazon is one that stands out,” said Sucharita Mulpuru, an analyst at Forrester.

Amazon Picks Favorites With Brands in ‘Pay to Play’ Move - Bloomberg

By 2020, Sandler reckons Amazon could have 100 million Prime subscribers, one of the biggest membership clubs of any industry, and worth a cumulative $70 billion. In this light, Amazon’s market cap of about $165 billion (which looks ridiculous when compared to last year’s profit of just $274 million) starts to look justifiable.

Amazon is building the retail world’s most unbreachable “moat”—and it’s called Prime - Quartz

The easiest thing to do would be to please shareholders today and simply keep forging ahead, blind to the changes in the market around you, but you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see that PC sales are dropping every year and that while they continue to drive huge profits for Microsoft today, it’s not a sustainable model in the long term. That is a textbook Innovator’s Dilemma.

Innovator’s Dilemma Is Real And Requires Bold Action To Overcome | TechCrunch