“I hate lectures. Within the first five minutes, I am checked out,” said Humphrey, a student who prefers using class time for in-depth discussions. “Digital stuff is always better than someone talking at me.”

From cellular mitosis to using semicolons, most subjects have remedial material that is important to know and difficult for professors to translate into a creative lecture or an active discussion. If these dull-but-necessary lessons migrate out of the classroom, professors can use the extra time for more creative, complicated and nuanced topics.

Here’s why I never have to teach anything boring again - Quartz

Mr. Armato says he frequently hears from scholars that they turn to Amazon for the books they need, especially when interlibrary loan proves too slow or cumbersome. The downside is that “this has gone hand in hand with the decline of library sales for the university-press monograph,” he says. Scholars might buy fewer books through Amazon if their libraries were buying more of those books in the first place. University presses also wonder to what extent libraries are buying books directly from Amazon as well as through the distributors that traditionally deliver scholarly books to the library market. Amazon doesn’t really share customer data, so “we just don’t know where those books are going,” Mr. Armato says. “We have no idea who the final purchasers are.” (Ms. Darksmith at California’s press says that, as a retailer with a focus on customer service, Amazon isn’t really “set up to feed back that kind of information” to the suppliers whose goods it sells.) For its part, Amazon considers university presses “an important and growing business for us, and we appreciate the role they play in disseminating research and education content,” a company spokeswoman says via email. “We don’t comment on our business terms, but we always work to develop strong professional relationships with publishers, including university presses, so together we can deliver low prices and a great experience for our customers.”

Around Retail Giant Amazon, University Presses Tiptoe and Whisper - Publishing - The Chronicle of Higher Education

“We originally thought that young people would use Facebook and digital communication to stage-manage their lives,” said Wardle. That wasn’t the case. Candid messages are thrown into the digital ether without regard for their permanence or the number of eyeballs that can scrutinize them. “They found it much easier to articulate how they felt to each other honestly when they weren’t in the same room,” he said.

Not-so-secret lives on smartphones : Columbia Journalism Review

In general, whenever you’re analyzing a data set you really need to think about: how was it created, what biases or assumptions went into creating that data set; In the same way, when you’re reading somebody else’s data journalism, you really need to think through what assumptions were made in that model or in that analysis. And of course, we can’t do that if we don’t have a citizenry and a group of journalists who are sufficiently literate in algorithms and analysis to be critically literate.

New York Times Chief Data Scientist Chris Wiggins On The Way We Create And Consume Content Now | Fast Company | Business Innovation

American Facebook users spend way more time on the social network than exercising. Mark Zuckerberg said today on Facebook’s Q2 earnings call that “people on Facebook in the US spend around 40 minutes each day using our service”, while the CDC recommends Americans exercise 21 minutes a day but only 20% of people meet that goal.

American Users Spend An Average Of 40 Minutes Per Day On Facebook | TechCrunch

The trouble always starts when teachers are told to put innovative ideas into practice without much guidance on how to do it. In the hands of unprepared teachers, the reforms turn to nonsense, perplexing students more than helping them. One 1965 Peanuts cartoon depicts the young blond-haired Sally struggling to understand her new-math assignment: “Sets … one to one matching … equivalent sets … sets of one … sets of two … renaming two… .” After persisting for three valiant frames, she throws back her head and bursts into tears: “All I want to know is, how much is two and two?”

Why Do Americans Stink at Math? - NYTimes.com

If the company wants to abruptly, drastically change the nature of their work, it can do so at will, and its employees have zero recourse if their bottom line is slashed. That’s because they aren’t technically employees, but contractors, bereft of the same protections and benefits granted to full-time workers. Management is invisible. When Rabbits stormed the company discussion forum with complaints, it was shut down, while the company, like Uber, balks at the idea that it’s an employer of any Rabbits at all. TaskRabbit is a platform. TaskRabbit is a mediator. TaskRabbit is not a bad boss, because it was never a boss to begin with — it’s just operating an algorithm. The notion of unionization in the “sharing economy” is of course preposterous and unheard of — not even Facebook has organized — so who needs collective bargaining when you’ve got trust, and community, and other ukelele-and-Vimeo startup platitudes?

If TaskRabbit Is the Future of Employment, the Employed Are F*cked

An examination of the final paper required for Mr. Walsh’s master’s degree from the United States Army War College indicates the senator appropriated at least a quarter of his thesis on American Middle East policy from other authors’ works, with no attribution.

Mr. Walsh completed the paper, what the War College calls a “strategy research project,” to earn his degree in 2007, when he was 46. The sources of the material he presents as his own include academic papers, policy journal essays and books that are almost all available online.

Most strikingly, each of the six recommendations Mr. Walsh laid out at the conclusion of his 14-page paper, titled “The Case for Democracy as a Long Term National Strategy,” is taken nearly word-for-word without attribution from a Carnegie Endowment for International Peace document on the same topic.

Senator John Walsh of Montana Confronts Questions of Plagiarism - NYTimes.com

"Presidents come and go. Students come and go. Trustees come and go," the commenter said. "Professors are eternal." They might be—if their colleges survive.

New Role for College Business Officers: Selling Change - Administration - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The new study, which analyzed data from the Current Population Survey from 1976 to 2012, illustrates that the recession had a disproportionately large effect on routine jobs, and greatly sped up their loss. That is probably because even if a new technology is cheaper and more efficient than a human laborer, bosses are unlikely to fire employees and replace them with computers when times are good. The recession, however, gave them a motive. And the people who lost those jobs are generally unable to find new ones, said Henry E. Siu, an associate professor at the University of British Columbia and an author of the study. Young people and those with only a high school diploma are much more likely to be unemployed and replaced by a machine, he said. And to the authors’ surprise, men are more vulnerable than women. “When you look at data, women who would otherwise be finding middle-paying routine jobs tend to be moving up the job ladder to these higher-paying brain jobs, whereas men are much more likely to just be moving from blue-collar jobs into not finding a job,” said Mr. Siu, who wrote the study with Guido Matias Cortes of the University of Manchester, Nir Jaimovich of Duke University and Christopher J. Nekarda of the Federal Reserve in Washington.

Technology, Aided by Recession, Is Polarizing the Work World - NYTimes.com