Over the last several decades, colleges have learned how they can strategically use their institutional aid dollars to increase both their prestige and revenue. With the exception of the most elite schools, nearly all private, nonprofit colleges provide merit aid, often to the detriment of the low-income students they enroll. Many less well-endowed schools provide deep discounts to affluent students because they believe they must do so to survive, while other fairly wealthy colleges use their aid as a competitive weapon, to try to break into the top echelon of schools, as defined by publications such as U.S. News.

College Are Paying for Richer Students to Boost Their Ranking | New Republic

The amount of potential unlocked by the industrial revolution is dwarfed in information terms by what you can do with computers,” said Ari Geshner, a senior software engineer at Palantir, a much-discussed data analysis startup whose customers include US intelligence and defense agencies. “Digital literacy is about learning to use the most powerful tools we’ve ever built.

Digital Literacy Is the Key to the Future, But We Still Don’t Know What It Means | WIRED

These sanctions have driven down Hachette authors’ sales at Amazon.com by at least 50 percent and in some cases as much as 90 percent,” reads the letter from Authors United, which currently has around 1,070 names attached. “Because of Amazon’s immense market share and its proprietary Kindle platform, other retailers have not made up the difference. Several thousand Hachette authors have watched their readership decline, or, in the case of new authors, have seen their books sink out of sight without finding an adequate readership. These men and women are deeply concerned about what this means for their future careers.

Nearly 1,100 Authors Say Amazon Feud With Publisher Has Hurt Sales By Up To 90% – Consumerist

Over the years, I’ve noticed that when I do have a specific reason to ask everyone to set aside their devices (“lids down,” in the parlance of my department), it’s as if someone has let fresh air into the room. The conversation brightens, and more recently, there is a sense of relief from many of the students. Multi-tasking is cognitively exhausting — when we do it by choice, being asked to stop can come as a welcome change. So this year, I moved from recommending setting aside laptops and phones to requiring it, adding this to the class rules: “Stay focused. (No devices in class, unless the assignment requires it).” Here’s why I finally switched from “allowed unless by request” to “banned unless required.”

Why Clay Shirky Banned Laptops, Tablets and Phones from His Classroom | Mediashift | PBS

The facial recognition system has come under fire from privacy groups for mixing traditional mug shot photos with non-criminal faces pulled from employment records and background check databases. The system is expected to collect as many as 52 million faces in total. Some in the industry have also called out the IPS as ineffective, based on its relatively low rate of success. For a given face, NGI returns a list of 50 candidates, and only promises an 85 percent chance that the suspect will be on the list.

The FBI just finished building its facial recognition system | The Verge

Self-confidence is great, but not at the expense of considering others. A survey of high-school students that has been repeated for the past 60 years presents a startling picture. In 1950, 12 percent of students agreed with the statement, “I am a very important person.” By 1990 that had risen to 80 percent. Other scholars have found that student scores on an index of empathy have been going down over the same period. Moreover, recent research in cognitive science suggests that media overload (often implicated in iCreativity) may reduce compassion, empathy, moral reasoning, and tolerance. For many young people, if they cannot insert themselves into an experience—capture it in what some observers call “life-catching”—and share it online with friends, then it is not worth the effort.

Thinking ‘Bigger Than Me’ in the Liberal Arts - NEXT: The Future of Higher Education - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Still, the results surprised us. We had expected enormous differences in human and machine grading. In more than 79 percent of assignments, the agreement between scores assigned by the instructor and those assigned by the automated system matched up.

Are We Ready for Robots to Grade? - NEXT: The Quest for Student Success - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The most productive employees didn’t work full eight-hour days, and they took 17-minute breaks for every 52 minutes of work.

The Exact Amount Of Time You Should Work Every Day (via fastcompany)

(via fastcompany)

There are less than a couple hundred people who are involved in the most significant attacks, and [they’re] almost all Russian-speaking," he says. "There’s a tremendous amount of organizational and hierarchical structure with a robust economy of scale that delivers both data mining, carding [credit card sale dumps] and other services which exists as quasi-untouchables in a way almost unheard of since Al Capone and his gangs in the 1920s.

What’s really driving cyberattacks against retailers - The Washington Post

"Wholesale removal of thousands of cases from PACER, particularly from four of our federal courts of appeals, will severely limit access to information not only for legal practitioners, but also for legal scholars, historians, journalists, and private litigants for whom PACER has become the go-to source for most court filings," Leahy wrote Friday to US District Judge John D. Bates, the director of the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO).

Senator demands US courts recover 10 years of online public records | Ars Technica