A new analysis from the San Francisco Fed finds entry-level earnings for new college grads — defined as working graduates age 21 to 25 — grew only by 6 percent from April 2007 to April 2014. In comparison, median weekly earnings for all workers grew two-and-a-half times as fast, at 15 percent. And while recent grads tend to fall behind after any recession, the gap since the Great Recession has been both wide and long-lasting.

Young college grads’ wage growth is falling farther and farther behind - Vox

It struck me that part of the reason we always stay jacked in is that we want everyone — at the other end of the phone, on Facebook and Twitter, on the web, on email — to know that we are part of the now. If we look away, we worry we will disappear.

David Carr, writing eloquently as usual about the death of print. (via parislemon)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.

Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

Terrible book, but a great quote.

(via stoweboyd)

We can now say that self-published authors earn more in royalties than Big 5 authors, combined. This may reverse itself by the time February rolls around, but it adds weight to a recent story in The Guardian about the unsustainability of traditional publishing if authors continue to earn less while their publishers earn more. It bears putting a number here and stressing what we are seeing: Self-published authors are now earning nearly 40% of all ebook royalties on the Kindle store. The days of looking at self-publishing as a last option are long gone. A lot has changed in six months.

July 2014 Author Earnings Report – Author Earnings

“I wanted to give freshmen more control over the process, first because we’d have fewer roommate changes,” Mr. Austin told me, “but also because, if students were more invested in that roommate, they would try harder to work things out before they requested a roommate change.” In fact, he says, letting students participate in selecting their roommates may play a more significant role in residential harmony than the matching algorithm itself. Among incoming Lowell students who found a roommate on RoomSync last year, about 1 percent later asked to change rooms. Among those who tried the app but did not choose a roommate on it, the figure was 4 percent. Among those who did not try the app at all, it was about 8 percent.

Avoiding Roommate Shock, Online - NYTimes.com

I think we are in the initial phase of the next evolutionary step of the librarian as liaison. I touched upon this in my last post about the shift from “knowledge service provider to collaborative partner.” ARL is also focusing on “new roles for new times” exploring the move from a collections-centric to an engagement-centered model. And recently a paper from Ithaka (Anne Kenney, Cornell) builds upon this theme by outlining how librarians are becoming more embedded in the research life of campus. This includes things like technology development, data services, grant assistance, and publishing support.

A Liaison for a Classroom Building? Curating a Learning ecosystem. - The Ubiquitous Librarian - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Readers themselves have a keen sense of what kind of reading is best suited for which medium. My survey research with university students in the United States, Germany, and Japan reveals that if cost were the same, about 90 percent (at least in my sample) prefer hard copy for schoolwork. If a text is long, 92 percent would choose hard copy. For shorter texts, it’s a toss-up. Digital reading also encourages distraction and invites multitasking. Among American and Japanese subjects, 92 percent reported it was easiest to concentrate when reading in hard copy. (The figure for Germany was 98 percent.) In this country, 26 percent indicated they were likely to multitask while reading in print, compared with 85 percent when reading on-screen. Imagine wrestling with Finnegan’s Wake while simultaneously juggling Facebook and booking a vacation flight. You get the point.

How E-Reading Threatens Learning in the Humanities - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education

We got a group together and said what we wanted to do, and the administration just said, ‘O.K., ask for any equipment or advice you need,’ ” said Colleen Perry, who is studying bioengineering. “We’ve definitely made mistakes, but it’s probably the first time in our lives that we’re not getting a grade and we don’t have anyone telling us what to do.

A Classroom Leaves the Syllabus to the Students - NYTimes.com

Consumers can sign up for $9.99 a month, and immediately have instant access to over 600,000 titles, including many bestsellers. Right now, it appears that the Big Five holdings aren’t available through this channel. But if the interface is as simple as “Buy Now with 1-click,” I’m guessing that many readers will jump the library ship. It’s still not clear how many authors will find this new service of interest.

Amazon Unlimited | American Libraries Magazine

A new study of over 1300 3rd to 5th graders found that parental monitoring of children’s media has ripple effects that extend across several different areas of children’s lives out into the future. For this study, my colleagues and I talked to children, their parents, their teachers, and even their school nurses, once at the beginning and once at the end of a school year. e asked parents whether they set limits on the amount of screen time their children were allowed to have each day, and also on the content of media their children were allowed access to. As one might expect, setting limits on the amount and content of children’s media is generally effective at reducing time on TV and video games and at reducing violent media exposure. However, seven months later we got a huge surprise. Children whose parents set more limits on the amount and content of media were now getting more sleep, had gained less weight (lowering their risk of obesity), were getting better grades in school, exhibited more helpful and cooperative social behaviors in school, and were less aggressive with their peers (as seen by the classroom teachers).

Kids on Screen-Time Diet Lost Weight and Got Better Grades - Scientific American