For the first time ever Google is now processing an average of one million removal requests per day. The new record follows an upward trend with copyright holders reporting more and more allegedly infringing search results in an effort to deter piracy.

Google Asked to Remove 1 Million Pirate Links Per Day | TorrentFreak

While 52% of respondents stated that security was a top priority when choosing a mobile device, 51% are putting their personal data at risk by sharing usernames and passwords with friends, family and colleagues. The survey of 2,000 consumers also questioned whether these passwords are strong enough to adequately protect consumers’ applications and the data they hold. Half of respondents stated that they try and remember passwords rather than writing them down or using password management solutions, suggesting that consumers are relying on easy to remember combinations and using the same password across multiple sites and devices.

51% of consumers share passwords

Facebook’s newsfeed only shows you a fraction of posts from your friends and reorders the posts based on how relevant they are to you. Twitter has traditionally shown you all tweets from people you follow in strict reverse chronological order. The new text makes clear that while that dynamic isn’t changing now, Twitter will also be adding tweets you might like.

Twitter now officially says your timeline is more than just tweets from people you follow - Quartz

Everyone always wants to know the answer to the same question, ‘How long do CDs last? What’s the average age?’ " Youket says. But "there is no average, because there is no average disc.

How Long Do CDs Last? It Depends, But Definitely Not Forever : All Tech Considered : NPR

The haptic and tactile feedback of a Kindle does not provide the same support for mental reconstruction of a story as a print pocket book does.

Researchers at Norway’s Stavanger University say that you’re less likely to remember stuff reading it from a Kindle than you are a book, and the fact that you don’t have to turn the page may be part of the reason. (via shortformblog)

High-income families who live in the urban Northeast, for example, are projected to spend nearly $455,000 to raise their child to the age of 18, while low-income rural families will spend much less, an estimated $145,500, according to the report. The figures are based on the cost of housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, education, child care and miscellaneous expenses, like haircuts and cell phones. But the estimates don’t include the cost of college — a big-ticket expense that keeps rising.

Average cost of raising a child hits $245,000 - Aug. 18, 2014

The future — of news, of storytelling, of knowing — has to, in some way, address this. The methods by which we filter and evaluate and accumulate information need to be transparent and readily interrogated. Not because openness is a panacea — it isn’t — but because knowing something is an iterative process which depends upon collaboration, and collaboration can’t happen in a dark room.

Byron the bulb: how the velocity of journalism is changing | The Verge (via thisistheverge)

(via thisistheverge)

FridayFunFact2: For the first time, the number of broadband subscribers with the major U.S. cable companies exceeded the number of cable subscribers, the Leichtman Research Group reported today. Among other things, these figures suggest the industry is now misnamed. Evidently these are broadband companies that offer cable on the side.

(from: The Internet Is Officially More Popular Than Cable in the U.S. | Business | WIRED)

(via analyticisms)

Once the words “computer” and “calculator” referred to people, those who performed mathematical operations. (While today computers are strongly associated with men and male engineering, more often than not, those people were women, as the cultural-studies scholar Anne Balsamo has pointed out. In the early 1970s, “computers,” machines, were sometimes marketed as “calculators.” By the end of that decade, the two terms would cease being synonymous. Imagine explaining to someone living in the 1940s that computers were handheld devices with nanometer-sized transistors inside, with which one could shop or play Flappy Bird while making a wireless telephone call. There’s no reason to believe we’re living through semantic changes that are any less profound. Words are a significant part of the drama of the social-media age.

The Internet of Words - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education